Horror Artist – Horror Fanatics http://horror-fanatics.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:51:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://horror-fanatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/horror-fanatics-icon-150x150.jpg Horror Artist – Horror Fanatics http://horror-fanatics.com/ 32 32 Jenn Espinoza’s poetry creates a world where trans people are safe https://horror-fanatics.com/jenn-espinozas-poetry-creates-a-world-where-trans-people-are-safe/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:33:42 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/jenn-espinozas-poetry-creates-a-world-where-trans-people-are-safe/ J. Jennifer Espinoza J. Jennifer Espinoza J. Jennifer Espinoza Pride Spotlight: For Pride Month, Observer is celebrating a variety of queer creations with our Pride Spotlight series. Keep an eye on the month for more profiles of artists, writers and more. Being an artist in general requires opening your inner self to the world, but […]]]>
J. Jennifer Espinoza J. Jennifer Espinoza J. Jennifer Espinoza

Pride Spotlight: For Pride Month, Observer is celebrating a variety of queer creations with our Pride Spotlight series. Keep an eye on the month for more profiles of artists, writers and more.

Being an artist in general requires opening your inner self to the world, but being a trans artist in particular often comes with a greater sense of vulnerability. Given that trans rights are so often considered debatable and trans perspectives are so often shouted down or violently erased, being truly honest in a public way about your emotions and lived experience as a trans person is often a challenge. scary business. As a poet and trans woman, Jennifer Espinoza (also writing under the pen name J. Jennifer Espinoza) sees creative expression, and specifically poetic form, as a means by which you can truly exist on your own terms, regardless of the expectations and demands of a world that constantly asks trans people to justify our existence.

“Marginalized communities are put in this position where we have to explain ourselves to people who have power over us or their boot on our necks,” she explains to Observer.. “I think there’s something about poetry that lets you get into a space where you can still have arguments and rhetoric, but it’s on your own terms, and you can invent your own logic. inside a poem. In that sense, you can get out of that dynamic of defending yourself on someone else’s terms, because it’s always a losing battle when you defend yourself based on language and rhetoric created to exclude you.

In poetry collections like I’m alive. It hurts. I love it. and There should be flowers, Espinoza gently but frankly captures the frequent whiplash of the trans experience, as a more direct political address is offset by images of stunning beauty and lyricism. His poems embody this notion of inventing your own logic, as Espinoza’s words clearly define and describe a worldview that is steeped in devotion and grace, yet unafraid to stand up for itself when needed. Although her work confronts the frequent horror of living as a trans person, her writing contains an enormous amount of love and care, a reminder that gentleness is sometimes a political necessity in a society so cruel to the marginalized.

All humans change dramatically over time, but the journey of transition gives you unique insight into the often fluid and unpredictable trajectories of life. For Espinoza, the process of finding your voice as a poet is inseparable from the parallel journey of finding your voice as a trans woman. “Like a lot of trans people, I picked a few things to throw myself into and forgot everything else, so I read voraciously as a kid and was really into writing,” says -she. “In the beginning, a lot of my poetry was about escapism, but also about finding other ways of being and living when I was literally unable to express who I was. When I started to taking poetry seriously and submitting work, I realized that if I had to present myself in this way, as a poet, who am I presenting? Who is the poet? Who is the speaker?

Jennifer and his wife Eileen Elizabeth Espinoza on their wedding day. Deanne Barrier Deanne Barrier

“It was happening when I had other accomplishments as well. I was coming out of a really bad fog at the beginning of 2012 and I realized that if I didn’t want to kill myself, I had to make the transition. He didn’t there are more options at this point. When that happened, my poetry blossomed and I felt ownership of my voice, whereas in the past I felt like the poet and I were two different people living in the same room.

When you’re trans, it can be easy to look back on parts of your life and step back, or generally feel disconnected from your pre-transition self, embarrassed either by how messed up you might have been, or by how much you tried to deny your own truth, as an artist who documented his own growth, Espinoza felt those kind of complex emotions going back to the early poems, when his sense of self-knowledge might not have be not been so developed. Now she is able to integrate past and present by conceptualizing the poet and the person as two interconnected yet distinct entities.

“There’s almost this separation that happens between me, Jennifer, and the poet. I don’t really like to think of myself as the speaker of my poems, even though the content of my poems is very much inspired by my life. I like to create distance, and that’s part of why I use a pseudonym, so I can tell the poet, Joshua Jennifer Espinoza, from the human being, Jennifer Espinoza. So here’s Jennifer in the middle, here’s this past self that I’m trying to figure out what to do with, and then here’s this poetic self that’s somehow less than me, but more than me at the same time.

Espinoza’s deliberate separation between poet and person comes not just from a need for self-reflection, but from the concern for safety that all trans people carry. “We all know that visibility is a trap for trans people. Unprotected visibility is simply having a target behind your back. It’s something I struggle with a lot, wanting my work to be read, wanting it to be out there, but not wanting to make me a target. I think there is also a sense of security in creating this distance between me and my work.

Even if there is apprehension about existing as a trans person, whether in your artwork or simply in the world, the unique inventive power of poetry makes it worth Espinoza. “Life is hard and sometimes poetry can allow us to transcend, if only for a moment, and create an alternative space that exists alongside but outside of current reality. A poem can be a doorway to a time or space of safety or peace of comfort or something that I don’t necessarily have access to in the normal world.

Spotlight on Pride: Jennifer Espinoza's poetry creates a world where every trans person is safe

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Scorn looks grotesque and beautiful https://horror-fanatics.com/scorn-looks-grotesque-and-beautiful/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:46:19 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/scorn-looks-grotesque-and-beautiful/ Upcoming shooter Scorn looks like an HR Giger painting come to life. The grotesque biomechanical aesthetic is gruesome, yet fascinating. Swiss artist HR Giger was a prolific artist of macabre biomechanical designs. Perhaps best known for creating Ridley Scott’s terrifying xenomorph Extraterrestrial, Giger has produced some of the most disturbing works of art on the […]]]>

Upcoming shooter Scorn looks like an HR Giger painting come to life. The grotesque biomechanical aesthetic is gruesome, yet fascinating.

Swiss artist HR Giger was a prolific artist of macabre biomechanical designs. Perhaps best known for creating Ridley Scott’s terrifying xenomorph Extraterrestrial, Giger has produced some of the most disturbing works of art on the planet. His attention to detail and the subtext of his images evoked wonder and horror. The biomechanical artwork that drips with gruesome and erotic suggestions has now inspired an equally disturbing game, Scorn.

Release scheduled for October 21, Contempt is a horror and survival shooter that looks every bit as grotesque and beautiful as its inspiration. The game sees the player controlling a nameless, skinless character in a world ripped straight from Giger’s surreal works. The world of Contempt is filled with winding blackened corridors, desolate ruins of a fallen society, and massive structures woven of flesh, bone, and metal. The level design is such that Contempt asks players to pay close attention to all the little details for clues as to what’s going on.

RELATED: Xenomorphs Return in Aliens: Dark Descent Cinematic Trailer

The hellish landscape of Contempt contains many types of creatures that the player must get rid of or ignore as they go deeper into this twisted maze of horror. All gear like elevators and bridge controls as well as weapons are also biomechanically designed. To use a gun or activate a command, the skinless does not simply interact with it, but rather connects to it. Weapons are literally attached to the player’s arm. It seems that this grotesque world never lets the player forget that flesh and machines share a symbiotic relationship, as if they depend on each other for survival.


The soundtrack is absolutely nightmarish and unnerving as the game is filled with disturbing sounds of pain and torment in the distance. Surreal and industrial, the music rhythmically suggests an omnipresent feeling of dread. Nothing seems at peace in the world of Contempt and, therefore, the soundtrack signals the player to always keep moving. In this way, Contempt seems to use its soundtrack as an effective method of achieving total immersion.

RELATED: How Indie Soulslike Dolmen Redefines the Cosmic Horror Genre

Running on Unreal Engine 4, Contempt looks breathtaking and terrifying at the same time. The biomechanical world is shrouded in darkness and obscuring mist, suggesting that every little nook could hold an enemy or a secret. Dim lighting and claustrophobic rooms mean players must explore this world with great care.


Serbian development studio Ebb Software has yet to reveal much about the title. However, the gameplay trailer, narrated by legendary horror actor, Doug Bradley, reveals key information about the game: “Contempt has no dialogue, so most of the narration comes from the environment.” This is a most intriguing concept because it allows each player to interpret what they want from their environment. It also suggests that the environment of Contempt is as much a character as the skinless one controlled by the player. By lending the story to players’ interpretation, the folks at Ebb Software are showing they truly understand and appreciate the artist who inspired this macabre horror game.


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How Terry Grant thrives as a true one-man band https://horror-fanatics.com/how-terry-grant-thrives-as-a-true-one-man-band/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:39:57 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/how-terry-grant-thrives-as-a-true-one-man-band/ Some forms of self-expression are inherently collaborative, and others are clearly a solitary effort. How many photographs or paintings were made by more than one person? But music is generally, to a greater or lesser degree, a team effort. Even artists who compose and arrange on their own usually work with a producer and an […]]]>

Some forms of self-expression are inherently collaborative, and others are clearly a solitary effort. How many photographs or paintings were made by more than one person? But music is generally, to a greater or lesser degree, a team effort. Even artists who compose and arrange on their own usually work with a producer and an engineer, or bring in session musicians to flesh out their ideas. But not Terry Grant, known as More Ghost Than Man. That name, unsurprisingly, says Grant, comes from a lingering sense of alienation. “I guess I always felt a bit out of place in most situations. Like I was there but didn’t belong, and if I stood still long enough, everyone would forget I’m even there. The name comes from this feeling. Besides, I thought it sounded good. I should probably talk to someone,” Grant adds with a laugh.

Grant, 48, is a true solo band, but he is also a videographer, conceptualist, in addition to being his own engineer and producer. Unusual, but, you might be thinking, so what? How much I would say, so many! The music and videos are without exception pristine designs, imbued with emotion and empathy, deep and complex, yet pleasing to the ear.

So how did someone from Canton, Ohio — a small town about an hour south of Cleveland where the only notable thing is that it’s home to the Pro Football Hall of Fame — ended up moving to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1997? and now finds himself living and working alone, producing the musical equivalent of giant skyscrapers?

“I was a guitarist in a hair metal band with aspirations of being Eddie Van Halen,” Grant says. “The irony here is I had a silly haircut, it looked like my mom had it. I decided to move to Nashville with the goal of becoming a session player and I’m fell in love with the creative energy of the city, how I also realized that I needed more than just a guitar to get my ideas out there.

(Credit: Terry Grant)

Hermetically sealed existence isn’t the easiest way to create such amazing music and videos, though. Does Grant enjoy all the pressure he puts on himself? “Basically, it’s two things: I’m not married and I don’t have children, so my only responsibility is my job. And yes, the pressure is intense, but my secret weapon is my sense of purpose. If you’re lucky enough to find something you totally believe in, just do it. To be honest, I don’t know how not to do what I do.

There is also the undeniable shyness evoked in his response about his artist name. “Most of the ideas I have feel so ‘out there’ that I’m embarrassed to let anyone else see inside the process. The truth is, I often feel like a gigantic idiot for large parts of the process of creating anything, and it’s only when I realize this crazy thing is actually going to work. , that I’m starting to feel like I know what I’m doing. I can see the final product in my head, but everyone else will only see what’s incomplete, weird, disturbing, or just plain dumb for which they stand, and I guess I don’t like the idea of ​​that.

Grant’s latest single, “We Have All the Time in the World” is taken from his extraordinary 2021 LP The worlds we created there. The track was released in April on 8D Industries and features a rolling, dragging groove, haunting melody, and is accompanied by video of a person (guess who?) in a post-industrial spacesuit floating through spectral space. time continuum.

Needless to say, Grant did absolutely everything, including making the costume. “I’ve done costumes before, so this costume, while it looks convincing, wasn’t as hard to create as it looks. I knew I really wanted to do a classic outfit, and the costume, much like the video itself, came together quite naturally. The languorous nature of the images forms a beautiful juxtaposition to the song.

This is a photo of Terry Grant, known as More Ghost Than Man in one of his music videos.
(Credit: Terry Grant)

Despite the title, it is not a cover of the Louis Armstrong song of the same name. “I hadn’t even considered Armstrong’s melody until long after the record came out. I actually have a running list of potential song titles, lyric fragments, and other random nonsense (that’s what I call it, actually) that I pull up every time I start a new piece. So the title would have come from there at some point,” he reveals.

The only big problem with being so totally, ruthlessly self-sufficient is the thorny issue of playing live. “I’ve been thinking about how to do a live show, and just me on stage, turning the knobs isn’t an option. I’d love to work with a rhythm section, and I’m exploring that possibility, but it’s not there are no concrete plans yet.

For anyone who hasn’t heard Grant’s music yet, it was summed up nicely by Grant in an interview with 5 Magazine as Berlin-era Bowie meets Massive Attack with a few more Flying Lotuses. But what brought him to electronic music and what does he currently listen to? “There was a three-hour block of electronic acts on MTV called AMP – that was around the time I moved to Nashville – and that got me into the Bristol sound, so of course Massive Attack, alongside acts like Tricky and Portishead, and simpler raves like Orbital and Underworld These days, what I usually listen to when I need to tune out is jazz (especially 70s psych and bebop) and ambient electronics. Currently though, I’m obsessed with Saharan rock guitar music like Mdou Moctar, Tinariwen and Bombino. So much energy in the music and a really eclectic mix of ‘influences that are somehow foreign and absolutely familiar at the same time. Highly recommended.’

This is a photo of Terry Grant, known as More Ghost Than Man.
(Credit: Terry Grant)

Grant is currently preparing an as yet untitled short film and also occasionally works as a sound designer creating sample packs for Loopmasters, a company that creates and sells sample packs for DJs and producers. “For me, the best part of any piece of music that I work on is the early hours, when you’re just looking for a spark and it’s all sort of formless, and then, sky is the limit. The sound design is great because it’s like you can do this really fun track over and over again without having to wait for the rest to fall into place.

And when it comes to the film project, there’s a sense of urgency tied to Nashville’s notoriously unforgiving summers. “I’m looking to include a horror element this time around, and I’ll probably start building sets this month. God willing, I’ll be shooting it soon, before the temperatures here get so bad that I risk melt under the studio lights.

*Single point of sale

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How to come and see avoids the problems inherent in anti-war films https://horror-fanatics.com/how-to-come-and-see-avoids-the-problems-inherent-in-anti-war-films/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/how-to-come-and-see-avoids-the-problems-inherent-in-anti-war-films/ Anti-war films have always faced an uphill battle. A director can use every technique under the sun to portray the brutality of war, creating films brimming with graphic violence to really hammer home the savagery of such an event, but they still come up against the same problem: how much war does it translate to […]]]>

Anti-war films have always faced an uphill battle. A director can use every technique under the sun to portray the brutality of war, creating films brimming with graphic violence to really hammer home the savagery of such an event, but they still come up against the same problem: how much war does it translate to the screen? . It may be cliché, but the film is a visual medium, resulting in a format where meticulously crafted imagery and deliberate use of body language can say more than an entire monologue ever could. The movie is essentially a big celebration of movement, and therefore, it’s no surprise that it lends itself incredibly well to the action genre. Watching Keanu Reeves shoot the lobby of a hotel at The matrix or a nightclub John Wick is cinema in its purest form, an elaborate dance of tightly choreographed moves where no lines of dialogue are required, and it’s hard to imagine such sequences would have even half their impact had they been shown. in a book or piece of music instead. There’s no better action format than film, and while it’s generated decades of entertainment for global popcorn audiences, it’s proven to be a serious problem every time the filmmakers tackle the controversial subject of war.

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A clear example of this can be seen in by Steven Spielberg film Saving Private Ryan. Its iconic opening, set during the assault on Omaha Beach as part of the Normandy landings, features some of cinema’s most explicit and heartbreaking imagery of war. Nothing embodies the saying that war is hell better than this, with Spielberg echoing it so much in the film’s marketing campaign. “Every war movie… is an anti-war movie,” he said Newsweek, a quote that should sum up the film, but as every artist learns, how an audience perceives their work can be very different from how it was intended. The sequence is a staple of the best action scenes of all time and was ranked by tv guide as the greatest cinematic moment on their 2001 list. While such inclusions are hardly made in bad faith, it’s odd to see such a gruesome sequence based on a real-life tragedy make it onto a list of “greatest cinema moments”. “alongside the rain dance of Sing in the rain and Humphrey Bogart say goodbye to Ingrid Bergman in casablanca.


Saving Private Ryan isn’t the only war movie to run into this problem, and it’s only the first in a long line that plagues the genre. The need to condense such horrific events into a three-act structure that fits within a standard length can make the concept of an anti-war film problematic from day one, risking turning what should be a powerful signal of alarm for humanity into a simple commercial product. Films that are too overtly anti-war have struggled to receive support from major studios, and those that do often fail to achieve their stated goals while producing something that will do well at the box office. Francois Truffautone of the leading figures of the French New Wave, once said “there is no anti-war film”, and although many filmmakers have tried to denounce it, there remains the defining quote on the topic.


RELATED: The 10 Best War Movies To Watch On Memorial Day

But if there’s a film that proves the opposite of Truffaut’s quote, it’s the 1985 film. come and see. Directed by the famous Soviet filmmaker Elem Klimovthe film depicts the occupation of Belarus by Nazi Germany in 1943 through the eyes of a young teenager called Flyora (Alexei Kravchenko) who aspires to join the Belarusian resistance movement. The film proved difficult to make, with Klimov having to fight censorship from the Soviet authorities for eight years before he was allowed to make the film (he only had to figure out the title of the film, a drastic departure from the much bolder movie Kill Hitler he had originally wanted). Even then, the production was far from easy, with its lengthy filming schedule and graphic content taking its toll on everyone involved. The film received a positive response upon its premiere at the 14th Moscow International Film Festival, and over the ensuing decades it became one of the most acclaimed films of the genre, becoming the benchmark to which all films anti-war must be compared to. Quite simply, come and see is a tough movie to watch, and its refusal to back down, overwhelming as it is, makes its Hollywood equivalents look like child’s play by comparison. Almost 40 years later, it has lost none of its impact.


But how does come and see accomplish a task decades of movies have failed? The answer comes from its unwavering commitment to portraying the horror of World War II no matter what, resulting in one of the most unsettling films ever made. He excels at depicting the atrocities of war without ever falling victim to Hollywood sensationalism, with Klimov ensuring that the viewer never confuses the events on screen with just another WWII entertainment. An example of this can be seen when Flyora returns to her native village following an attack by German paratroopers at the resistance movement’s camp. Accompanied by Glasha (Olga Mironova), a young girl who worked as a nurse at the camp, they find the village deserted. Flyora seems rather casual about the whole thing, even helping herself to her mother’s still-warm kitchen, but it’s clear something is wrong. Glasha spots him first. The flies, a gentle buzz that radiates throughout the village, and which increases as the scene progresses. Eventually it becomes too much and Flyora runs out of the house, sprinting in a seemingly random direction while shouting illogical thoughts about her family hiding on a nearby island through a bog.


Glasha follows, but not before she takes a single look back at the village, and it is here that the nightmare is confirmed. The bodies of the entire population of the village are piled up against a house, piled up as if they were only animals in a slaughterhouse. The plan lasts only a few seconds, but a few seconds are enough. The film does not dwell on the violence, instead focusing on its consequences and the effect it has on its characters rather than the act itself. Letting the viewer imagine the massacre makes it a considerably more terrifying moment and demonstrates Klimov’s refusal to bend to the formula of a traditional war film. It’s a shot that will chill even the most hardened viewers and serves as the climax to a sequence that is a masterclass in filmmaking. The gradual build-up, enhanced by its fantastic sound design and minimal use of dialogue, feels more like a horror movie than anything else, an approach that guides the rest of the film.

But it’s not just a single sequence; rather, it’s something that leaves a permanent mark on both of its characters. In the next scene, Flyora tries to drown Glasha upon learning the truth and soon after tries to commit suicide out of guilt. These two events highlight the impact of war on a physical and mental level and show the film’s commitment to avoiding the usual clichés of the genre. Rather than including the action purely for entertainment rather than adding to the overall story, Klimov lets the action linger long after it’s ended in a way that few movies replicate. . Flyora does not use these events as motivation to grab a gun and end the scourge of Nazism once and for all, rather he becomes the empty shell of a person whose direction in life is entirely decided by those around him. . The decision to present the story from the perspective of a 14-year-old boy may seem like a cheap trick to elicit audience sympathy, but Klimov is careful to avoid brazen attempts at sentimentality. In the final sections of the film, Flyora is hardly a character, just a passive vector to lead the audience from set to set. As the credits roll, he looks more like an old man than a teenager, and that’s only after living through the war for just a few days. God only knows what the next two years will bring.


come and see the refusal to include the usual action scenes associated with this genre goes to the heart of how it avoids the inherent problem of anti-war films. The previously mentioned village sequence circumvents this by skipping the show of gunfire and explosions to focus only on the aftermath, with other scenes using similar techniques to ensure that no second can be misinterpreted as mere entertainment. Chief among them, an extended sequence where an SS unit wreaks havoc on the innocent residents of Perekhody, feels like a deliberate attempt to avoid the quote-to-quote “happy” endings that war movies usually end with. No allied forces are riding up the hill to save the day here; instead, there’s just an unimaginable horror compounded by the length of the sequence, with Klimov forcing the viewer to watch every second of the tragedy. The masterful editing, which cuts between the scenes of violence and the shots of those who commit it (all of whom derive sickening pleasure from it), is certain to fill the audience with utter disgust. It could also be seen as a statement by Klimov, with the shots of people enjoying the violence somewhat mimicking how a typical audience would react to such a scene if featured in a more traditional film. But there’s sure to be no smiles from the audience here, with the sequence languishing in nightmare for so long you’ll be tempted to hit the stop button just to stop it. None of these scenes made it to the “greatest movie moments” list, and rightly so.


come and see is a hard movie to watch. Even for those who consider themselves jaded by cinematic violence, there is an authenticity to come and see that sets it apart from similar movies, a feeling that has only gotten worse because so much of it is based on real events. The action may lend itself beautifully to the middle of the film, but there’s an art to constructing an intricate sequence of moves that doesn’t just feel like a group of actors working on a script, with insane levels of work required to give to the public the thrills of the blockbuster. they are thirsty. But there is also an art to producing such a sequence which is the opposite of pleasure. It may seem like a wild ride, totally at odds with the concept of such a scene, but in the proper context it can have a profound effect on the viewer. come and see is a great example of this and uses the action in a way that avoids the biggest problem that all anti-war movies face. It’s one of the best films ever made. It is also the one that is very difficult to recommend. But, ultimately, it is a very important film, a visual document recounting one of the darkest periods of our history, and which all anti-war films should draw inspiration from.


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Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time Monsters Gets a Realistic, Body Makeover https://horror-fanatics.com/legend-of-zelda-ocarina-of-time-monsters-gets-a-realistic-body-makeover/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 02:43:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/legend-of-zelda-ocarina-of-time-monsters-gets-a-realistic-body-makeover/ Bongo Bongo, Dead Hand and other monsters from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time are transformed into gruesome nightmares in new fan art. new pieces of The Legend of Zelda fan art brings grotesque body horror to the land of Hyrule. The artwork was uploaded to Twitter by concept artist Andres Rios, and the […]]]>

Bongo Bongo, Dead Hand and other monsters from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time are transformed into gruesome nightmares in new fan art.

new pieces of The Legend of Zelda fan art brings grotesque body horror to the land of Hyrule.

The artwork was uploaded to Twitter by concept artist Andres Rios, and the images reimagine some Ocarina of Time’s monsters as true nightmarish abominations. Blood and gore can be seen dripping from Bongo Bongo’s disembodied hands, and every vertebra of his spine is visible, while Dead Hand is covered in oozing wounds, his mouth large and gaping. The Redeads and Skulltula are rendered in similar gruesome detail.

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Rios has also released similar reimaginings of Ocarina of Time’s Bio Poes and Stalfos, and he works on gruesome portrayals of Gohma, Darknut, Stalchild, and Volvagia. He also plans to bring in characters and creatures from Majora’s Mask to life in its unique and terrifying aesthetic. Several people commented on the post, complimenting his work and saying it brought back horrible memories of the creatures as they looked considerably cuter in-game.

The fifth main game of the The Legend of Zelda franchise, Ocarina of time, was released for the Nintendo 64 in 1998. Players control the hero Link as he travels the destroyed world of Hyrule to awaken powerful sages who can seal away the evil Witch King Ganondorf. The game introduced several gameplay mechanics that have since become staples in the action-adventure genre, including a target lock system and contextual buttons.

RELATED: Zelda: Breath of the Wild Voice Actor May Have Revealed a Popular Character’s Ancestor

Over seven million copies of the Nintendo 64 version of Ocarina of time were sold worldwide and the game was re-released for Nintendo 3D in 2011. It is considered by many to be one of the most influential games of all time by several titans of the industry, along with the founder of Rockstar and Grand Theft Auto director Sam Houser, dark souls and Bloodborne cdirector Hidetaka Miyazaki and Final Fantasy director Hajime Tabata, citing Ocarina of Time oneis an important source of inspiration. The direct sequel to the game, Majora’s Maskwas released worldwide in 2000 to similar praise and acclaim. Majora’s Mask sees Link trying to prevent the Moon from colliding with the land of Termina. It was also re-released on the Nintendo 3DS, and in 2022 the game became playable on Nintendo Switch Online. In 2022, Ocarina of time was inducted into the Video Game World Hall of Fame.


The next game of The Legend of Zelda franchise, a currently unnamed sequel from 2017 breath of the wild, is slated to launch in 2023. Along with promotional teasers, a few brief snippets of the game have been uploaded, giving viewers a taste of what it has in store. Notably, one features a decaying Master Sword and the image has sparked a tidal wave of fan speculation.

Source: Twitter

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Revisiting trauma with a refugee child turned artist https://horror-fanatics.com/revisiting-trauma-with-a-refugee-child-turned-artist/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/revisiting-trauma-with-a-refugee-child-turned-artist/ PARIS Petrit Halilaj knows something about how art can help lift children out of the horror of war, but also about the dangers of using it as a propaganda tool. class=”cf”> As a 13-year-old refugee from the Kosovo conflict in 1999, his felt-tip pen drawings of soldiers killing civilians were singled out by then-UN Secretary-General […]]]>
PARIS

Petrit Halilaj knows something about how art can help lift children out of the horror of war, but also about the dangers of using it as a propaganda tool.

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As a 13-year-old refugee from the Kosovo conflict in 1999, his felt-tip pen drawings of soldiers killing civilians were singled out by then-UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan as a powerful depiction of the impact of war on young minds.

Halilaj, now 36, has since become a successful artist and revisited these designs with a sweeping exhibition for Britain’s Tate and now at the kamel mennour gallery in Paris, separating his original images and exploding elements into huge facilities.

In the process, he tried to remember why he had finally refused to hand over the drawing he had prepared for Annan.

“At first I thought this was my chance to stop the war. I was rushing to finish a big drawing before it arrived,” Halilaj told AFP with a laugh.

It was, he thinks, his grandfather who dampened his excitement.

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“My grandfather was almost annoyed by my enthusiasm, he couldn’t stand my joy of drawing. He told me [Annan’s visit] was just theater.

When Annan visited the camp in Albania, accompanied by media from around the world, and asked if he could bring the drawing to a big UN meeting, Halilaj said no.

“Maybe I was thinking about my grandfather’s words,” Halilaj said. “But maybe I just felt like it was my drawing and I wanted to keep it!”

Teenager Halilaj made the drawings under the supervision of an Italian child psychologist who was volunteering at the camp.

His experiences have obvious relevance as millions of children are once again forced to flee a brutal European war, this time in Ukraine.

“In war, you learn to be afraid of strangers and others. It wasn’t until I was in the camp that I learned to connect with strangers again and having art was so important as a way of expressing publicity,” he told AFP. AFP.

But his new show emphasizes the importance of being guided by an expert in psychology.

His co-curator, Amy Zion, said she was concerned about seeing images of Ukrainian children being used to portray the war in newspapers recently.

“It worried me that it could so easily become a journalistic trope,” she told AFP.

“Petrit had a psychologist trained to work in traumatic situations who really understood how to frame the situation as therapy first and foremost, not as something to be instrumentalized.”

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Perhaps this is why many of the drawings did not feature violence, but rather peaceful scenes of nature and animals.

Revisiting them, Halilaj was fascinated to rediscover elements that suggested other issues that stirred in his young mind.

It highlights the huge colorful peacock that now dominates the exhibition space in Paris.

“Obviously that was also me dating in silence as a queer teenager. When I see the colors, I think: it’s a pride parade!” he laughs.

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“I had more to do inside than just the war.”

refugee child,

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Tragic Details That Turned Innocent Characters Into Horror Villains https://horror-fanatics.com/tragic-details-that-turned-innocent-characters-into-horror-villains/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:26:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/tragic-details-that-turned-innocent-characters-into-horror-villains/ Edgar Wright’s “Last Night in Soho” arrived with impossible expectations. A victim of eternal COVID-19 delays, anticipation for Wright’s latest horror opus may have been too high, and when it arrived, reception was mixed. Yet it remains a beautifully and lovingly crafted blend of supernatural scares, contemporary feminism, and Swinging Sixties flair. Thomasin McKenzie stars […]]]>

Edgar Wright’s “Last Night in Soho” arrived with impossible expectations. A victim of eternal COVID-19 delays, anticipation for Wright’s latest horror opus may have been too high, and when it arrived, reception was mixed. Yet it remains a beautifully and lovingly crafted blend of supernatural scares, contemporary feminism, and Swinging Sixties flair. Thomasin McKenzie stars as Eloise Turner, a rising fashion student who travels to London to study at the London College of Fashion. She doesn’t quite fit in, and when her school-sanctioned accommodation doesn’t work out, she seeks a room in Mrs. Collins’ (Diana Rigg) studio. That same night, Eloise is transported to the 1960s in her sleep where she embodies the spirit of Sandie (Anya Taylor-Joy), an aspiring singer looking to make it big.

Eloise soon witnesses what she believes to be Sandie’s murder, and for the rest of the film she works to prove it to contemporary law enforcement. Only Sandie wasn’t murdered. In fact, she’s very much alive as the older Mrs. Collins. What Eloise saw was Sandie murdering her manager and pimp, Jack (Matt Smith). Rather than fulfill her dreams, Jack prostituted her, and after going through enough trauma, Sandie finally ended it, murdering the men who commodified her.

If you or someone you know is dealing with domestic violence, you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. You can also find more information, resources and support at their website.

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Extracurricular writers dive into their body horror story https://horror-fanatics.com/extracurricular-writers-dive-into-their-body-horror-story/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 21:23:03 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/extracurricular-writers-dive-into-their-body-horror-story/ Anthology series, whether TV or comedy, allow writers to swing for the fences in a very limited space. While this format can be challenging, a well-done anthology will feature some of the most unique standalone stories. And Skybound Presents: After School is about to do just that with its debut issue, which features the story […]]]>

Anthology series, whether TV or comedy, allow writers to swing for the fences in a very limited space. While this format can be challenging, a well-done anthology will feature some of the most unique standalone stories. And Skybound Presents: After School is about to do just that with its debut issue, which features the story “Spineless,” available in stores now.

Written by Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead alongside artist Greg Hinkle, “Spineless” follows a teenage girl as she struggles with school. His parents got him a dog to help him through these difficult times. however, he turns out to be an abnormal pup, setting up a short story that will appeal to fans of aliens and body horror. In honor of the release of Skybound Presents After School #1, CBR spoke with Benson and Aaron, who primarily deal in film and television, including Moon Knight and Loki Season 2 – about their first comic, working with Hinkle, and working in a new medium.


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CBR: Initially, you have been working together for a long time. How is it to work together? What makes you two such good partners in crime?

Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead: It feels much more like a friendship and a dating session than a business partnership. Writing this comic together was a loose process at Justin’s dining room table as the LA sunlight warmed our hands at the keyboard for just a few days. Of course, we mostly talked about it like it was a movie because that’s the language we speak. We both have this mutual conviction that the other is a genius, so when ideas fly, it’s madness for two.


Even minor disagreements pass off as ideation, so we never feel like the other is trying to steal something from you. We just build ourselves to be as wild as possible. Storytelling in this world needs so much more weirdness, and After school challenged us to challenge each other to make the strange worse.

How was your collaboration process with Greg Hinkle?

Good God, it was so easy. He understood our framing instincts and also, God bless him, helped us translate our ideas into things that actually worked for our first comic. Our written material that we gave him because the script was very prescriptive and dense (twice as long as the comic itself), but although he delivered it with the precision of a sniper, we would also say that he still offered us so many good surprises from his experience. We hesitate to call him mere talent, as that might imply that he didn’t become so talented through endless hard work, but is God so talented.


You have both worked in television, including both Moon Knight and the next Loki Season 2. What are the main differences between bringing a story to life on screen and in the comics? What are some of the biggest similarities?

First, performers are everything to us in cinema. We follow their instincts when shaping our films. In comics, the voice in the reader’s head is the interpreter, so it becomes a whole different set of neural pathways when you design the story. Second, there is no visual budget in comics. It costs as much to draw a forest as it does to invade a space army. In indie movies especially (but it happens in Marvel stuff, too, we swear), the practicalities of your boundaries place limits on where your mind can wander. Honestly, it might work for the best, but you have to look into the format.


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Specifically, how does working with horror on screen compare to working with horror on the page?

Again, we’re going to be far too pragmatic about the answer here. There’s a reason no one has knocked down the king of practical special effects in film – [John] Carpentry The thing. At the time, there would be an entire unit dedicated for months to meticulously shooting these hands-on FX gags of tentacles and gore. It holds today. Nowadays, for many reasons, it is almost impossible to spend this kind of time and money, and these thinner elements are either minimized or relegated to visual effects (made mainly by artists who work hard on computers , as opposed to practical effects, which are things that are actually created and shot on set).


We use both tools in our films. To fully understand them when they are at the center of the story, it takes a lot of time and money. In the comics, you just need the brilliant mind of Greg Hinkle to interpret those gross things you make up. So we leaned into our love for big practical effects on the page that we rarely have the budget for on a movie.

By focusing on After schoolwhat appealed to you the most in this anthology project?

No one had asked us to write a comic before. We always wanted it. We would have said yes to anything. We love graphic novels and comic books. Anyone reading this, if you have a readymade comic anthology that only needs writers for one issue, please ask us.

Why Your Comic “Spineless” Fits Well With Skybound Presents: After School?

We admit that we first found it, conceptually, a bit cheesy to make a parable of morality, but we were just closed-minded. All of our films are allegories for one theme or another, and there’s no reason we can’t explore the idea of ​​trust here. It’s more on the surface in After school than most of our other work, but that didn’t stop us from having fun getting to know Nora and Janie. We are also both totally obsessed with dogs. Doing a comic about an alien dog was an instant slam dunk.


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What was the inspiration for “Spineless?”

It was basically about combining several ideas, one of the horrors of nature and the other very charming things about our species. First, there was inspiration from those parasitic wasps whose larvae take over spiders and make them build an unusual kind of web that acts like a cocoon. So basically, [they’re] owning another species to create some sort of vessel, more or less what our alien visitor does here.

Then there was the idea that all of us, like Homo sapiens, tend to anthropomorphize our pets. So if they were animated by some malevolent non-terrestrial entity, we would probably be blind and snuggle up in our beds with them, ignorance being a sweet bliss. Then there was the idea of ​​a dog that could make our coffee…

What were you most looking forward to seeing illustrated from your screenplay?

The image of Janie with coffee in the kitchen with a cigarette hanging from her mouth; it was basically the first image that we discussed and which has remained the one that is kind of the tonal thesis of the story. Also obviously it’s a huge reveal for Nora, but we all sort of get along with Janie at this point… Like, who hasn’t been caught in the kitchen with a spoon dipped in Halo Top at four o’clock in the morning ?

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“Spineless” isn’t afraid to use gore and body horror, so what about those horror elements that you particularly liked? What does he bring to this story?

Again, a lot of it was just the lure of being able to go wild with footage that couldn’t be done without production methods and budgets that just aren’t really available in science filmmaking anymore -fiction/horror.

“Spineless” ends with a shocking twist. If you had the chance to develop this story, what would you like to explore next?

We’ve probably seen everything Janie’s meat planet has to offer in this brilliant panel from Greg, so obviously this should be an existential drama about dog Janie dealing with the deep guilt of what her material body did then that he was possessed by a parasitic inter-dimensional alien.

But seriously, really any concept that would make it possible to aim to write comics like Alan Moore or Neil Gaiman – basically given the privilege of trying to use the medium in a way that’s both literary and achievable only in the medium him -same.

What excites you about this anthology in general?

See some of the boldest voices in independent cinema today run wild with their imaginations.

Skybound Presents: Afterschool #1 is on sale now from Image Comics and Skybound Entertainment.

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Spackman Media Group Artist Son Suk-ku Ranks No. 1 in Brand Reputation of Actors in Korea | Taiwan News https://horror-fanatics.com/spackman-media-group-artist-son-suk-ku-ranks-no-1-in-brand-reputation-of-actors-in-korea-taiwan-news/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 05:10:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/spackman-media-group-artist-son-suk-ku-ranks-no-1-in-brand-reputation-of-actors-in-korea-taiwan-news/ Spackman Media Group artist Son Suk-ku took the top spot in actors’ brand reputation in Korea, according to Korea Corporate Reputation Research Institute Son Suk-ku’s latest film THE OVERVIEW surpassed the 9 million viewer mark, topped the weekend box office for three consecutive weeks since its release Following his role in THE OVERVIEWSon Suk-ku is […]]]>
  • Spackman Media Group artist Son Suk-ku took the top spot in actors’ brand reputation in Korea, according to Korea Corporate Reputation Research Institute
  • Son Suk-ku’s latest film THE OVERVIEW surpassed the 9 million viewer mark, topped the weekend box office for three consecutive weeks since its release
  • Following his role in THE OVERVIEWSon Suk-ku is set to star in two highly anticipated Netflix original K-dramas, DP Season 2 and DEADLY TOY

SINGAPORE – Media OutReach – June 6, 2022 Spackman Entertainment Group Limited (the “Band“), a leading Korean entertainment production group founded in 2011 by media and technology investor Charles Spackman, would like to announce that Son Suk-ku of the group’s associated company, Spackman Media Group Limited (“Spackman Media Group“), took the top spot in the brand reputation of players in Korea, according to the Korea Corporate Reputation Research Institute.

The result was obtained by brand analysis of 50 actors from May 5 to June 5. She studied the big data of the reception of the brand by consumers and the volume of media & community interest on the actors. Son Suk-ku scored 84.57% in the brand reputation ratings, ranking first among the 50 actors.

Son Suk-ku’s latest film, THE OVERVIEWa sequel to the 2017 hit THE OUTLAWS, surpassed the 9 million viewer mark. The crime thriller has topped the weekend box office for three straight weeks since its May 18 release day. The film was pre-sold in 132 countries around the world, including Singapore, China, Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia and France. , as well as regions in North America and Eastern Europe.

Following his role in THE OVERVIEWHis Spackman Media Group’s Suk-ku is set to headline Netflix’s upcoming two highly anticipated original K-dramas, DP Season 2 and DEADLY TOY. Alongside Son Suk-ku, DP Season 2 brings back main cast members Jung Hae-in, Koo Gwan-hwa, Kim Seong-gyun, while adding newcomers Ji Jin-hee and Kim Ji-hyun. Based on the webtoon DP DOG DAY by Kim Bo-tong DP tells the story of a Korean military police team with a mission to catch deserters. The series is directed by Han Jun-hee and co-written by Kim Bo-tong.

Produced by Showbox, DEADLY TOY stars Son Suk-ku from Spackman Media Group and Choi Woo-shik from the film PARASITE (2019). Netflix’s K-drama is based on the popular webtoon series of the same name and is set to release in the second half of this year.

Son Suk-ku is represented by SBD Entertainment Inc. (“SBD Entertainment“), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Spackman Media Group that represents and manages the careers of 12 artists. In addition to Son Suk-ku, SBD Entertainment also represents one of Korea’s rising young actors, Han Ji-hyun du popular K-drama THE PENTHOUSE 3who won Best Rookie Female Actor at the 2021 Brand Customer Loyalty Awards in Korea and endorsed luxury brand Gucci in April 2021.

About Spackman Entertainment Group Limited

Spackman Entertainment Group Limited (“SEGL“or the”Company“), and with its subsidiaries, (the “Band“), is one of the leading entertainment production groups in Korea. SEGL is principally engaged in the independent development, production, presentation and financing of motion pictures in Korea.

The company was founded in 2011 by renowned media and technology investor, Charles Spackman, who served as the company’s Executive Chairman until 2017. For the past two decades, Mr. Charles Spackman has been a powerhouse in Korean entertainment industry from the early 2000s with the pioneering success of Sidus Pictures, the largest film production company at the time and the first to be listed in Korea. Mr. Spackman is also the Founder, Chairman and CEO of the global investment firm Spackman Group. For more information, please visit http://www.charlesspackman.com and Social media icon https://spackman-group.com/charles-spackman.

Since its inception, SEGL has produced more than 30 major motion pictures, including a number of the highest-grossing and award-winning films in Korea, namely #LIVING (2020), CRAZY ROMANCE (2019), DEFAULT (2018), MASTER (2016), THE PRIESTS (2015), SNOWDROPS (2013), COLD EYES (2013) and ALL ABOUT MY WIFE (2012).

Our films are distributed and released theatrically in Korea and overseas markets, as well as for subsequent post-theatrical worldwide release in other forms of media, including online streaming, cable television, broadcast television, IPTV, video on demand and home video. /DVDs, etc. Generally, we release our films in a major theatrical exhibition first in Korea, then in overseas and ancillary markets.

The Group also invests in and produces Korean television dramas. In addition to our content business, we also hold interests in entertainment-related companies and film funds that can financially and strategically complement our existing core businesses. SEGL is listed on the Catalist of the Singapore Exchange Securities Trading Limited under the symbol 40E.

Production labels

SEGL owns Novus Mediacorp Co., Ltd. (“Novus Mediacorp“), investor, broadcaster and/or post-theater distributor for a total of 79 films (58 Korean and 21 foreign) including ROSE OF TREASON, THE OUTLAWS and SECRETLY, A LOTwhich was one of the biggest box office hits of 2013 starring Kim Soo-hyun from MY LOVE OF THE STARSas good as FRIEND 2: THE GREAT LEGACY. In 2012, Novus Mediacorp was also the distributor of post-theatrical rights ALL ABOUT MY WIFE, a highly lucrative romantic comedy produced by Zip Cinema. In 2018, THE OUTLAWSco-presented by Novus Mediacorp, broke the all-time highest video-on-demand record (“VOD“) Sales records in Korea. For more information, please visit Social media icon http://novusmediacorp.com

The Company holds a 100% interest in Simplex Films Limited (“Single-sided films“) which is an early stage film production company. Simplex Films’ debut film, JESTERS: THE GAME CHANGERS (2019), was released in Korea on August 21, 2019. Simplex Films has several film line-ups including HURRICANE BROTHERS (working title).

The Company holds a 100% interest in Take Pictures Pte. ltd. (“Take photos“) who produced STONE JUMP (2020) and THE BOX (2021), and will publish THE GUEST in the second half of 2022 and A MAN OF REASONwith previous job title GUARDIAN in 2022 provisionally.

The Company holds a 100% interest in Greenlight Content Limited (“Green light content“) which mainly engages in investment activities in fiction and films, as well as consulting services for the production of Korean content. Thanks to the acquisition of Greenlight Content, the first fiction co-produced by the Group, MY SECRET TERRIUS, starring Korean star So Ji Sub, reached No. 1 in drama ratings for its timeslot and recorded double-digit viewership ratings for its highest ratings. Greenlight Content was one of the main investors of MY SECRET TERRIUS.

The Company holds a 20% stake in The Makers Studio Co. Ltd., which plans to produce and broadcast four upcoming films, the first of which will be GHOST ISLAND OF GLAMORa comedy horror movie.

Talent Representation

The Company holds a 43.88% effective interest in Spackman Media Group Limited (“SMGL“). SMGL, a company incorporated in Hong Kong, together with its subsidiaries, is collectively one of the largest entertainment talent agencies in Korea in terms of the number of artists under management, including some of the biggest names in the industry. Korean entertainment industry SMGL operates its talent management business through renowned agencies such as MSteam Entertainment Co., Ltd. (Son Ye-jin, Wi Ha-jun, Lee Min-jung, Ko Sung-hee ), SBD Entertainment Inc. (Son Suk-ku, Han Ji-hyun, Lee Cho-hee, Park Keun-rok), UAA&CO Inc. (Kim Sang-kyung, Kim Hye-ri, Kim Ji-young, Wang Ji- won), Play Content Co., Ltd. (Kang Min-ji, Hwang-hwi) and Kook Entertainment Co., Ltd. (Baek Si-won, Shin Ji-woong). Korea, SMGL represents and guides the professional careers of a roster of award-winning actors/actresses in the practice areas of film, television, commercial endorsements and branded entertainment SMGL takes part i of its unparalleled portfolio o artists as a platform to develop, produce, finance and own the highest quality entertainment content projects, including motion pictures, variety shows and television series. This platform also creates and derives opportunities for SMGL to make strategic investments in early-stage companies that can collaborate with SMGL artists. SMGL is an associated company of the Company. For more information, please visit Social media icon http://www.spackmanmediagroup.com

The Company holds a 100% interest in Constellation Agency Pte. ltd. (“Constellation Agency“). Constellation Agency, owner of The P Factory Co., Ltd. (“The factory P“) and Platform Media Group Co., Ltd. (“PMG“), is primarily involved in the overseas agency business for Korean artists venturing into the overseas market. The P Factory is an innovative marketing solutions provider specializing in the production of event and branded content. PMG is a talent management agency that represents and manages the careers of major artists in film, television, commercial endorsements and branded entertainment.

Strategic companies

The Company also operates a coffee shop, Upper West, in the Gangnam district of Seoul and owns a professional photography studio, noon pictures Co., Ltd.

For more details, please visit Social media icon http://www.spackmanentertainmentgroup.com/

#SpackmanEntertainmentGroup

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TV tonight: Diana Ross is ready to party with her first UK performance in 15 years | Television & radio https://horror-fanatics.com/tv-tonight-diana-ross-is-ready-to-party-with-her-first-uk-performance-in-15-years-television-radio/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/tv-tonight-diana-ross-is-ready-to-party-with-her-first-uk-performance-in-15-years-television-radio/ Platinum Evening at the Palace 7:30 p.m., BBC One Buckle up for another extravaganza to celebrate the jubilee (and more to come below – it’s unmissable). The two-and-a-half-hour live concert features performances from Queen and Adam Lambert, Duran Duran, Andrea Bocelli and – with her first UK live show in 15 years – Diana Ross. […]]]>

Platinum Evening at the Palace

7:30 p.m., BBC One

Buckle up for another extravaganza to celebrate the jubilee (and more to come below – it’s unmissable). The two-and-a-half-hour live concert features performances from Queen and Adam Lambert, Duran Duran, Andrea Bocelli and – with her first UK live show in 15 years – Diana Ross. Kirsty Young and Roman Kemp will host the party, which also features guests such as David Attenborough, Emma Raducanu, David Beckham, Stephen Fry and Julie Andrews. Hollie Richardson

The Grand Jubilee Party of the National Lottery

5 p.m., TVI

It might feel a bit uncomfortable to see such scintillating public celebrations being held right now, given the current circumstances. But here’s another bash, this time hosted by Jason Manford and Fleur East. Heather Small, Mark Owen, Kaiser Chiefs, Becky Hill and Ella Henderson provide the live music. Hannah Verdier

For a penny

7 p.m., TVI

This admirably absurd roadshow from a Saturday Night Takeaway segment proved to be the perfect vehicle for Stephen Mulhern’s nerdy but quick-witted patter. To wrap up the current race, he and his glittering gold jacket challenge Essex shoppers with silly tasks to earn a quick buck. Graeme Virtue

Alex Ferguson: never give in

7:30 p.m., Channel 4

After surviving a brain hemorrhage in 2018, venerable football manager Alex Ferguson recorded his legacy in this two-hour film. Diving into the personal and the professional, he recounts his working-class roots in Scotland all the way back to his 26 years at Manchester United. Contributors include Eric Cantona. HOUR

Depp vs Heard: winners and losers

9 p.m., Channel 5

The Johnny Depp/Amber Heard libel lawsuit is finally over, ending six weeks of sordid (“My dog ​​stepped on a bee!”) memes, poor court tactics and a depressing amount of misogyny online. This documentary goes back to the bones of a case that basically brought out the worst instincts in many people. Jack Seale

Later – With Jools Holland

10:30 p.m., BBC 2

Kae Tempest is headlining at the Alexandra Palace Theater tonight. Joining them are rockers Kasabian, rapper Kojey Radical, jazz singer Judi Jackson and rapper Knucks. Kae and Kojey then join Jools to reminisce about the Later Archive performances. HOUR

Choice of movies

Toy Story 2, 3:15 p.m., BBC One

Disney Pixar’s Toy Story 2 on BBC One. Photography: Pixardisney/Allstar

Pixar’s 1999 sequel to their hit animation surpasses the original in emotional breadth and dramatic invention. With a bittersweet twist that will quickly become the company’s trademark, John Lasseter’s comedy plunges Woody (Tom Hanks) into an existential crisis. After being kidnapped by evil shop owner Al (Wayne Knight), he must decide whether he belongs as a collectible – forever kept in a display case with his newly found cowboy brothers – or at home. with his owner Andy, knowing he will. eventually be thrown away. It’s not all angst, as Buzz (Tim Allen) and the other toys embark on a highly entertaining mission to save their friend. Simon Wardel


Raw, 01:10, Channel 4

Not a movie to watch right after a big meal. Julia Ducournau — who, with this and Titane, quickly becomes the heir to David Cronenberg’s body horror realm — delivers meaty drama about family and desire. Garance Marillier plays Justine (the name’s nod to De Sade presumably intentionally), a student who joins her older sister Alexia (Ella Rumpf) in veterinary school. While the former face a week of initiation rituals, the vegetarian Justine fights a new desire for flesh – of a particular kind. It is a splendid nightmare, with baroque flourishes and the relentlessness of tragedy. SW

Live Sports

Formula E Jakarta ePrix, 8:30 a.m., Channel 4 The ninth round of Indonesia.

Test Cricket: England v New Zealand 10.15am, Sky Sports Main Event Day three of the first test at Lord’s with England captain Ben Stokes (pictured above). The second Test of the three-game series begins Friday at 10 a.m. at Trent Bridge.

Race: The Derby 12.40pm, ITV Four support races and the 4.30pm Cazoo Derby from Epsom.

Super League Rugby: Castleford Tigers v Wigan Warriors 1.30pm, Channel 4 A 14th round match of the season at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle.

UEFA Nations League: Hungary v England, 4.15pm, Channel 4 Group A3 match at the Puskás Arena in Budapest.

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