Horror Artist – Horror Fanatics http://horror-fanatics.com/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:00:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://horror-fanatics.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/horror-fanatics-icon-150x150.jpg Horror Artist – Horror Fanatics http://horror-fanatics.com/ 32 32 Lovecraft-inspired horror game explores the cost of creation https://horror-fanatics.com/lovecraft-inspired-horror-game-explores-the-cost-of-creation/ https://horror-fanatics.com/lovecraft-inspired-horror-game-explores-the-cost-of-creation/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:40:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/lovecraft-inspired-horror-game-explores-the-cost-of-creation/ Well is the latest microscopic horror game from Yames, the developer behind other puzzling dishes like Water matrix world and Discover my body. It takes about 20-30 minutes to complete (maybe a bit longer if you, like me, have trouble getting the game to work in full screen). Yames releases these little games periodically, first […]]]>

Well is the latest microscopic horror game from Yames, the developer behind other puzzling dishes like Water matrix world and Discover my body. It takes about 20-30 minutes to complete (maybe a bit longer if you, like me, have trouble getting the game to work in full screen). Yames releases these little games periodically, first at their Patreon subs, then for a small fee on itch.io a bit later. They’re secret until they’re not, and I still can’t quite remember how I came across them.

From December 27, 1929 to January 4, 1930, famous author of strange fiction and bigot noted HP Lovecraft released a series of 36 sonnets known collectively as Yuggoth mushrooms. The game of Yames Well is based on the 14-line poem of the same name, developing the original’s obsessive story into an interactive experience that is played with one button. Both are as gruesome and beautiful as you might expect, but the game is tucked away in a place so deep and dark in my mind that I haven’t figured out how to flush it out yet.

During WellIt’s about half an hour, you’ll use the Z key to lower a rope into a hole in the ground, pull it out, examine what you find, pet a friendly cat, and move forward through the game’s eerie plot. deals with a farmer by the name of Seth Atwood, who, just like in Lovecraft’s poem, went mad while digging a well on his property. His nephew, who was helping with the project, eventually killed him and carved “ungodly signs” into his naked body.

A pixelated cat wearing a pentagram charm on her collar.

Screenshot: Yames / Kotaku

The well has since been walled up, and it’s up to you and your anonymous companion (he owns the cat, by the way) to see where it leads. What you find is a confusing collection of tokens, each more bewildering than the next: a totem pole that contracts and transforms in your hand; something plump and throbbing “like a woman’s belly full of slugs”; and finally, the corpse of the cat who graciously accepted your affection as you worked, easily identified by the pentagram medallion he wears.

Suddenly you are somewhere else, maybe at the bottom of the hole itself. It is your job to help the birth of something. You pull on what appears to be an umbilical cord until the creature is free. “She’s beautiful” are the last words you hear before the credits roll.

The act of creating something, whether it’s jotting down a poem, digging a well, giving birth, or focusing every fiber of your being on guiding a supernatural abomination through the fabric of reality, its ethereal world of eternal torment at our most brief. – can be painful. To tell you the truth, just going through that previous sentence, making sure you imbued it with a sense of fluidity and meaning, was enough to wear me out briefly.

I say “maybe” because there are some among us for whom creation, at least to outside observers, seems as instinctive as breathing. You know the type, the bright, natural artists who can create a wonderful original melody within minutes of sitting down at a piano, or scribble a hilarious and realistic caricature of the noisy couple at the table next door with just a broken pencil. and a towel. I am not one of those people. Of course, these skills are almost always the product of years of hard work that I’m not always aware of, but I hate and love these people equally all the same. My own minor flirtations with creation are never so easy.

A pixelated body marked with strange signs.

Screenshot: Yames / Kotaku

I have experienced several nervous episodes of varying intensity while writing my recent More heroes 3 review, with solutions ranging from “I need to get up and drink a glass of water before I scream” to “I will go to bed and sleep for 14 hours”.

Not only was it important for me to “get it right” as a longtime fan of Goichi “Suda51” Suda’s work, but also the fact that professional criticism still doesn’t come naturally to me. When I finished, I felt like every sentence of that 2,056 word review had been viciously torn from me. And although it was a bit tidy for Kotaku, I felt like my blood was on those draft pages next to the comparisons with El Topo and Alejandro Jodorowsky.

Even the most skilled artists are limited by physical limitations. No work will ever equal the boundless imagination of the human mind. The realm of the possible doesn’t have to contend with hiding brushstrokes or conforming to an academic’s idea of ​​perfect grammar and use of words. Concessions, painful or worthy of a shrug of the shoulders, will always be necessary to transform something of thought into reality; no one crosses this border without losing something in the process, be it a finger or a fingernail.

Well is ostensibly about a cult and its monstrous deity, yes, but it’s also about the cost of creation. Artists from all walks of life and mediums engrave their works in their skin so that everyone can see them. They give up a part of themselves to offer the world something new, even if it doesn’t match the seamless image they have in their mind. The artist Is as best they can to shape reality into at least a fleeting likeness of beauty in their imaginations even though, in the end, all of them see is a bloody, slimy mess where others perceive a poem, sculpture or painting.


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Diana Thorneycroft’s new work sees artist branching out into cinema https://horror-fanatics.com/diana-thorneycrofts-new-work-sees-artist-branching-out-into-cinema/ https://horror-fanatics.com/diana-thorneycrofts-new-work-sees-artist-branching-out-into-cinema/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/diana-thorneycrofts-new-work-sees-artist-branching-out-into-cinema/ Welcome to the extraordinary imagination of Diana Thorneycroft. In 2021, his thoughts, his world and perhaps the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a fairy tale like no other. It’s an animated stop-motion story that follows Quinn, a strange being, who sets out on a macabre journey, visiting a sanatorium that features characters such as Horse-head […]]]>



Welcome to the extraordinary imagination of Diana Thorneycroft.

In 2021, his thoughts, his world and perhaps the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a fairy tale like no other. It’s an animated stop-motion story that follows Quinn, a strange being, who sets out on a macabre journey, visiting a sanatorium that features characters such as Horse-head Girl and Gord the Goat, filling a basket with items that he loots along the way.

Art preview

Click to enlarge

Black Forest Sanatorium

By Diana Thorneycroft

  • Platform Center for Photographic and Digital Arts, 121-100 Arthur St.
  • As of October 29

The seven-minute film features the sets Thorneycroft used to create it, 13 desk-sized dioramas adorned with evergreen and twig trim, or designed to look like laboratories, dotted with tiny animal skeletons on their walls.

The animated film, the puppets and the sets are part of Black Forest Sanatorium, Thorneycroft’s latest exhibition, which opens today at the Platform Center for the Photographic and Digital Arts and runs through October 29.

“Some people can come in and look at a thing and run away, which has happened before, but I think there’s something for everyone in there. There is humor, but it’s dark and it’s fun, ”says Thorneycroft.


Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibit, Black Forest Sanatorium, debuts on September 17. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Her latest exhibition began during the first few weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the award-winning Winnipeg surrealist would spend days at home getting back to the basics of art – putting a pencil on paper and drawing.


Diana Thorneycroft (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Diana Thorneycroft (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Thorneycroft had a vision that the drawings would be part of an exhibition, but other artists, including Winnipeg filmmaker Danielle Sturk, encouraged her to take it further and make her first foray into animation.

She was initially afraid of adding cinema to her artistic repertoire, but the suggestion became too good to be overlooked by a risk-taker like Thorneycroft, who has courted wonder and controversy at the during his 30-year career in the arts, as well as numerous awards, including the Winnipeg Arts Council’s Making a Mark Award in 2009 and the Manitoba Arts Award of Distinction in 2016.

She was ready to dive headlong into the project, learning the ropes as she worked, but decided to hire experienced hands in film and animation, Mike Maryniuk and Evin Collis, to take part of the burden.


A work from Diana Thorneycroft's new exhibition Black Forest Sanatorium.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

A work from Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibition Black Forest Sanatorium. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

“I took courses at the Winnipeg Film Group. I thought I could do the camera work myself. I thought I could do the animation myself, and if I was 20 I could do it, but I’m not, so I had to hire, “Thorneycroft said during a break in setting up the exhibit. ”Mike entered my brain. I don’t know, we are like we were separated at birth. ”

Thus, in addition to being a designer, painter, sculptor and photographer, Thorneycroft can call herself a director, thanks to Black Forest Sanatorium and teaming up with a small team that helps make the film.


A work from Diana Thorneycroft's new exhibition Black Forest Sanatorium.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

A work from Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibition Black Forest Sanatorium. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

“It was the collaboration with other people that made it really special,” she says. “For visual artists, we are used to working alone. For filmmakers, you have to hire people.

Puppets are a fusion of found works of art, which have marked many of Thorneycroft’s recent works, including Black Forest (Village), which debuted at the Vernon Public Art Gallery in British Columbia in 2019 and Black Forest (dark waters), which premiered at the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba in Brandon in 2018.

Some of the pieces from these exhibitions have been found in Black Forest Sanatorium, she says. Horse heads of childhood models and dolls make up many of the characters’ faces, while these 2020 pandemic designs became the backdrops for many of the film’s sets and dioramas in the exhibition.


Diana Thorneycroft's new exhibit, Black Forest Sanatorium, debuts on September 17.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibit, Black Forest Sanatorium, debuts on September 17. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

An alcove in the Platform gallery next to the dioramas offers visitors the opportunity to view the film. The combination of the two not only makes it easier to follow Thorneycroft’s imagination, but it also makes it possible to appreciate the detailed work that Maryniuk and Collis did to create the film from the sets of Thorneycroft.

“People come in and watch the animation, then look around, or look around first and watch the animation and see it in a different light again,” she says.


Diana Thorneycroft's new exhibition focuses on characters from a mental institution.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibition focuses on characters from a mental institution. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Winnipeg singer-songwriter Christine Fellows, who branched out into sound effects and sound mixing for films and music videos, provides an eerie soundtrack to match Thorneycroft’s unconventional landscapes in Black Forest Sanatorium.

“Basically I said, ‘Here’s the ball, go run with it,’” Thorneycroft says. “I didn’t really realize. I let her play.”

Sturk, whose 2018 documentary, El Toro: the best truck stop in town, landed a spot in HotDocs at the Toronto International Film Festival and was among the Top 10 Audience Picks at the Gimli Film Festival in 2019, was a fan of Thorneycroft photography, but gleaned the film’s possibilities later, having seen other creations from Thorneycroft.


The idea for Diana Thorneycroft's new exhibit, Black Forest Sanatorium, took root in the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

The idea for Diana Thorneycroft’s new exhibit, Black Forest Sanatorium, took root in the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

“When I was in the studio it was the three-dimensional aspect that we see now, which looks really alive,” says Sturk, who has his own show, Jukebox: El Toro, opening scheduled at La Maison des Artistes on September 23.

She says Thorneycroft’s latest reminds her of Tim Burton movies like Corpse Bride and beetle juice that bridge the gap between horror and comedy.

Comedy and horror are also two sides of Thorneycroft’s personality. People who meet her immediately notice her humorous side; people who have only encountered some of his controversial works and have scratched their heads in confusion or revulsion only see part of Thorneycroft’s world.


Winnipeg artist Diana Thorneycroft at the Platform Center for Photographic and Digital Arts.  (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Winnipeg artist Diana Thorneycroft at the Platform Center for Photographic and Digital Arts. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

“When I was doing my black and white photographs in the ’80s and’ 90s, people would come up to me and say, ‘You’re so normal! I thought you would be six foot seven and all black leather with a whip.’ “Thorneycroft said.

“A lot of people think dark things but they suppress them or don’t talk about them. For me, that’s fertile ground to get the job done.”

alan.small@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @AlanDSmall

Alain Petit

Alain Petit
Journalist

Alan Small has been a reporter for the Free Press for over 22 years in a variety of roles, the latest being a reporter in the Arts and Life section.

Read the full biography


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Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties ~ A Mother From Hell [Spoilery Comic Book Review] https://horror-fanatics.com/hellboy-and-the-bprd-1957-family-ties-a-mother-from-hell-spoilery-comic-book-review/ https://horror-fanatics.com/hellboy-and-the-bprd-1957-family-ties-a-mother-from-hell-spoilery-comic-book-review/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 19:11:29 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/hellboy-and-the-bprd-1957-family-ties-a-mother-from-hell-spoilery-comic-book-review/ Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties gives us a darker look at 1950s America in this side story of the Hellboy universe. In particular, a housewife and the abusive mother she could do without. You never know what those perfect looking suburban homes might be hiding. Cover artists: Laurence Campbell and Dave Stewart. […]]]>

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties gives us a darker look at 1950s America in this side story of the Hellboy universe. In particular, a housewife and the abusive mother she could do without.

You never know what those perfect looking suburban homes might be hiding. Cover artists: Laurence Campbell and Dave Stewart.

Hellboy original creator Mike Mignola and Chris Roberson are the writers of Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties. Laurence Campbell is the artist, with Dave Stewart as colorist and Clem Robins as letterer. Laurence Campbell and Dave Stewart are also responsible for the main cover art. Which is also the only cover. There are no variations of blankets here to admire. Oh, and Dark Horse Comics is the publisher of this one-shot comic.

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties will go on sale September 15, 2021. You can purchase printed copies at your local comic book store. Or, if the digital version is fine for you, you can download it directly from Black horse comics.

Warning: spoilers for Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties below. If you want to discover this parallel story at a glance Hellboy universe for yourself, stop here and return after the demonic screams are over.

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties ~ Plot summary

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 - Family Ties 1 preview page.
Nice old cars there.

This side story stars the titular Hellboy and his fellow BPRD agent Susan Xiang in 1957 in Ohio, United States. Their mission for today? Find and collect a paperback on witchcraft and demonology that a silly publisher decided to reprint before it did any harm. What harm, you will ask me? Well, remember this is a setting where the magic is real. As Hellboy himself puts it, “It’s like giving a kid a stick of dynamite and a box of matches. Something is doomed to explode.

Their investigation leads them to a normal-looking suburban house, where a very scared housewife greets them, while lying to someone else inside about who our BPRD duo really is. The housewife, a Mrs. Gladys Stemple, moved in with her mother harpy and it was hard enough for her, but that’s not why she stopped our duo. Apparently the thing with her mother has gotten “strange”.

When our duo enter the house, the strangeness goes up several notches. The interior of the house is in ruins, with all furniture destroyed. Hellboy even stumbles upon the mutilated corpse of a… dog? Cat? It’s a little hard to say, but it bothers him anyway. He is also disturbed by the sight of a long mummified male corpse in the bathroom. The sight of a teenager with his mouth shut with the skin freaks him out even more, though the kid also receives Hellboy’s sympathy.

Hellboy finally confronts the demon in the basement of the house, with this copy of this book of witchcraft and demonology. Said demon seems to be fused with Gladys’ mother, both in body and in spirit. Susan reading Gladys ‘mind reveals that this is the result of the child using this book to innocently try to summon a demon, only for the demon to possess Gladys’ mother. Hellboy is in a bit of a mess, as he’s trying very hard not to hurt the old woman in the demon. Gladys comes to the rescue in the form of this same book, which contains a spell that drives out unwanted spirits, including demons. After Susan convinces her, as the head of the house, to do so, Gladys exorcises the demon.

Gladys finally finds the courage to ask her mother harpy to move out, and Hellboy and Susan finally get the damn book back. In short, a great working day for the BPRD It also marks the end of Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties.

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties ~ The Good

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 - Family Ties preview page 3.
Well, not good per se, but a good way to introduce goose bumps.

The story looks like a side quest from the main series. It’s short, but sweet. Or rather, short, but horrible. Exactly like a good Hellboy story should be. It’s an action-horror comic, after all. This little subplot with Gladys is a nice icing for this damn cake.

Laurence Campbell’s art also really nails the Hellboy see. It’s suitably dark and scary, suited to this universe. It’s also nice to see how the story begins with white borders when the duo are outside and changes to a black border as they enter the House of Horror. The borders do not turn white again until Gladys exorcises the demon. It’s a nice background touch there.

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties ~ The bad

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 - Family Ties preview page 5.
And that’s how wickedness begins.

I feel like the only thing that’s really wrong with Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties is the short length. Or rather, what looks like a short length. It’s a standalone story in one comic book issue. I realize that it will be short. I just wish it was a bit longer, that’s all.

Conclusion

Hellboy and the BPRD: 1957 – Family Ties is a beautiful comic parallel story for the Hellboy universe. It’s its own little one-issue story with more emphasis on horror than action, and a nice ending too. If you want to read this short story for yourself, check it out at Dark Horse Comics.

Source: Dark Horse Comics


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INTERVIEW: BENJAMIN PERCY on Bringing Werewolves to the Pandemic in WEREWORLD https://horror-fanatics.com/interview-benjamin-percy-on-bringing-werewolves-to-the-pandemic-in-wereworld/ https://horror-fanatics.com/interview-benjamin-percy-on-bringing-werewolves-to-the-pandemic-in-wereworld/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 18:30:03 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/interview-benjamin-percy-on-bringing-werewolves-to-the-pandemic-in-wereworld/ For quite a long time, zombies have been the ultimate metaphor for humanity’s violent tendencies, and they’ve packed a lot of punch. Insane consumerism, highly contagious crowd mentalities, and predatory capitalism were all things zombies wore quite well on their shuffling bodies throughout the 1960s until the early 2000s. Our time, however, where deteriorating social […]]]>

For quite a long time, zombies have been the ultimate metaphor for humanity’s violent tendencies, and they’ve packed a lot of punch. Insane consumerism, highly contagious crowd mentalities, and predatory capitalism were all things zombies wore quite well on their shuffling bodies throughout the 1960s until the early 2000s.

Our time, however, where deteriorating social structures and highly infectious viruses dominate the political landscape, may call for a more brutal and subversive monster. Writer Benjamin Percy found exactly that, and he’s fiercely convincing: the werewolf. In her new short story, wereworld, Percy makes a creepy but strong argument as to why these indiscriminately snarling and sadistic creatures are the monsters of our time.

wereworld is an urgent horror story about, essentially, a werewolf pandemic. I use the word pandemic with every ounce of meaning that the current gap between the voluntarily vaccinated and the unvaccinated has widened over the past year. A mysterious virus appears to create werewolves, and it is unclear how people are infected. A man in a small town watches the wolf virus make its way to his community to tear it apart, both figuratively and literally. Spot misinformation, denial and fear, all of which are now part of our new normal.

Percy weaves a tale in the tradition of Stephen king‘s Werewolf cycle (1983) in which the politics of small towns prove to be as vicious and monstrous as the things that come out on a full moon.

As Werewolf cycle, wereworld presents color illustrations between chapters. Francesco Francavilla lends his signature inks, as well as his orange and red-heavy art style, to these pages, adding a richness to the textures already defined in the story to better flesh out his world. As Bernie wrightson before him, Francavilla knows how to extract the horror already present in each chapter while leaving just enough room for readers to fill the darker parts of the story with their own dark imaginations.

wereworld
Illustration of the wereworld by Francesco Francavilla

Rhythm corresponded with Benjamin Percy to talk about werewolves, the pandemic, and give classic monsters something new to say about us. It follows below.


RICARDO SERRANO: wereworld feels like a horror story that’s about distance, of how we let paranoia, fear, and perceived threats keep us away from each other. There are certainly very direct references to the COVID pandemic in history that tie into this, for example. What were you trying to capture or exploit with this news?

BENJAMIN PERCY: Speculative stories often channel cultural unrest. We live in a time of fear and paranoia. I was exploiting this when I wrote wereworld. Contagion is spreading and no one knows the truth of what is to come. As a result, the people are separated; because no one knows how the infection spreads, anyone could be an enemy. A colleague, a neighbor, even a family member.

I gave the werewolf myth an analog to the pandemic. Because it always occurred to me, watching movies like An American werewolf in London or read novels like Hour of the wolf, that there was something inauthentic about their content. If a werewolf were on the loose, there wouldn’t be one, but several. A constantly evolving pack. Exponential growth. They are, after all, machines of rage and hunger.

As the title suggests, I am writing about a planetary crisis, but I have chosen to gradually reduce the focus. In a city, a street, a house. A family is in crisis, and they are going to have to defeat their inner demons if they are to survive the monsters on their doorstep.

SERRANO: The illustrations by Francesco Francavilla, which reminded me a bit (in terms of implementation) of those of Bernie Wrightson in Stephen King’s book Werewolf cycle, gift those snapshots of the world you have created and do a great job of conveying the violence it contains. How did you approach the selection of images and how much did they reveal?

PERCY: He’s a brilliant artist – whom I’ve been in love with ever since I read his collaboration with Scott Snyder in Detective Comics, about ten years ago now – so I’m glad to call him partner in crime. We talked about Bernie wrightson and Stephen king, Yes. We also talked about EC Comics as the general vibe.

He asked me to throw three or four ideas for each month of the calendar (the story is divided into twelve chapters, a year in the life of a small town). And I did, but I also told him to ignore them completely, because his vision is the best. He read the story. Then he considered the suggestions. Then we entered into a generative conversation. Her illustrations are all perfect – they show just enough of it. Because horror exists in the shadows. Sometimes the involvement is more electrifying than a direct revelation.

wereworld
Illustration of the wereworld by Francesco Francavilla

SERRANO: As a writer you have a job that sometimes includes adding new twists to proven horror genres. I think about your zombie comic Year zero and how his story unfolds. Did you tinker with the werewolves idea for a while or did you all click all of a sudden seeing what was going on all around us?

PERCY: Werewolves have always been my favorite monster … because like Angela Carter once written, we are all hairy on the inside.

I have a grade six artifact – a “research” article titled “WEREWOLVES!” (Yes, with an exclamation mark) – in which I detailed the history of lycanthropy and even performed a ceremony to become one (spoiler alert: it worked!).

My breakout novel – Red Moon, released in 2013 – is about werewolves.

And I… missed them. wereworld has been in my brain for a long time. It’s kind of like a strange mixture of The purge, american beauty, and Contagion, while the veneer of civilization collides with an overwhelming savagery.

SERRANO: Did you take elements from other werewolf movies, books, video games, or comics when you built your story?

PERCY: Werewolf cycle is an obvious influence, as we have organized the story into twelve chapters, each with its own unique illustration.

I also take my hat off partly for Ginger biscuits, in that the onset of puberty in girls is linked to themes of transformation.

SERRANO: Another classic monster you’re looking to dive into for a unique version?

PERCY: I have a Frankenstein concept (already fleshed out) that I would like to write. I’ve been sitting on it for over a decade (if only there was enough time).


wereworld is now available digitally on the NeoText website.


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Banksy artwork shredded at auction https://horror-fanatics.com/banksy-artwork-shredded-at-auction/ https://horror-fanatics.com/banksy-artwork-shredded-at-auction/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 17:46:41 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/banksy-artwork-shredded-at-auction/ Love is in the trash, Banksy’s iconic image of a girl with a heart-shaped balloon – but with a twist. Half of the painting is shredded, the strips hang down under the picture frame. The work was originally titled “Girl With Balloon,” but some typical Banksy misdeeds changed all that one day in October 2018. […]]]>

Love is in the trash, Banksy’s iconic image of a girl with a heart-shaped balloon – but with a twist.

Half of the painting is shredded, the strips hang down under the picture frame.

The work was originally titled “Girl With Balloon,” but some typical Banksy misdeeds changed all that one day in October 2018.

It had just been sold as the last lot of a Sotheby’s auction in London.

But a hidden shredder concealed in the frame has come to life.

Art managers at Sotheby’s auction house hold Banksy’s “Love is in the Bin”, before it returns to auction at Sotheby’s, London on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Dominic Lipinski / PA via AP)

The crowded auction room watched in confusion – and perhaps a bit of horror – as the painting slowly sliced ​​into pieces.

Emma Baker, contemporary art specialist at Sotheby’s, was responsible for sales that fateful night.

She remembers the moment that stunned the art world.

“The hammer fell and all of a sudden we heard this beep. It was not a Sotheby’s alarm. So we were all like ‘what’s going on? And everyone was sort of out of their seats, phones in the air, hands over mouths, ”she says.

“I looked, and I was standing on the banks of phones at the time, I looked and the photo seemed to have fallen halfway out of the frame. And it wasn’t until a little later that we realized he had really shredded.

The painting sold for just over £ 1million ($ 1.4million), well above its indicative estimate of £ 200,000-300,000, before being shredded.

It was a record for the artist.

But demand for Banksy has skyrocketed since then.

His work now regularly sells for millions of dollars, with a painting honoring the work of the UK Health Service, selling for a record $ 20 million earlier this year.

The collector who won the auction in 2018 chose to keep the work, despite its altered condition.

It seems to have been a smart financial move, as Sotheby’s believes Love is in the Bin will sell for a lot more at its auction next month.

“This work comes up for auction with an estimate of £ 4-6million, which is the highest estimate ever placed on a Banksy at auction,” says Baker.

“But if you look at it in the grand scheme of Banksy’s high prices over the past three years, it still looks appealing, it looks conservative when you compare it to these pieces, because it’s probably his most famous work of art. . “

Sotheby’s insists it wasn’t in the 2018 shredder prank.

And Banksy has a form for that kind of guerrilla performance art.

He secretly stenciled a rat on a wall at Sotheby’s during a Damien Hirst exhibition in 2004, and he hung unauthorized artwork everywhere from the British Museum in London to the Louvre in Paris.

Sotheby’s expects no trick when Love is in the Bin goes up for auction next month.

But surely another Banksy hit will happen someday?

“Never say never, it’s Banksy, you can’t predict anything and that’s exactly what he does,” says Baker.

“He played us last time. I’m sure he could probably do it again. Who knows?”

The half-ragged piece of art Love is in the Bin will be auctioned off by Sotheby’s on October 14 in London.


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A horrible hallucinatory journey, but ultimately a disappointment https://horror-fanatics.com/a-horrible-hallucinatory-journey-but-ultimately-a-disappointment/ https://horror-fanatics.com/a-horrible-hallucinatory-journey-but-ultimately-a-disappointment/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 21:44:07 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/a-horrible-hallucinatory-journey-but-ultimately-a-disappointment/ Ben Wheatley’s budget hallucinatory horror mishmash In The Earth poses a promising terror, following a scientist and a ranger as they venture deep into a remote forest to check out scientific equipment as the world fights a deadly virus. An ambiguous evil force awaits you in the woods, as does horror in human form. The […]]]>

Ben Wheatley’s budget hallucinatory horror mishmash In The Earth poses a promising terror, following a scientist and a ranger as they venture deep into a remote forest to check out scientific equipment as the world fights a deadly virus. An ambiguous evil force awaits you in the woods, as does horror in human form.

The film begins as a grim, dark flashback, carried by psychedelic visual appeal and a captivating ambient score, to transform into a violent and crass thriller. Macabre fears of the dark arts variety are strewn; the workings of the universe are called into question, science clashes with spirituality, but most of these ideas are bypassed to make way for the piercing of the flesh and the sparkle of trippy artistry. In the ground is a horrible ethereal journey, but not as much to think about as it promises.

We open up the view to vast wooded land through a cave hole, followed by close-ups of a hammer crashing into rocks. Martin (Joel Fry) walks along rural roads, dressed as a backpack, before reaching Gantalow Lodge. He is greeted at an outside “disinfection point” by a woman in hazmat suits and a man wearing a surgical mask. The man shares that several in the village have died.

Martin then meets his guide, park warden Alma (Ellora Torchia), a seemingly bright and wise girl who shares a local folk tale with Martin. We learn that Martin has been in isolation for 4 months. The two venture out into the forest together, where they will check out the equipment. Martin reconnects with the many images and sounds of “the outside”. Alma essentially trains Martin, who is lost, tearful, and a bit useless.

First night of camping, there is a violent croak in the distance. An air of grim despair permeates just a day in their trek. They spend a short time lost and arguing. The camera moves smoothly but unsteadily, looking at the couple like an intruder, shedding a sense of misery that awaits them.

They find the tents of a family who seems to have disappeared. Martin discovers a strange rash on his leg. Later that evening he was woken up from his sleep by a man. In the morning, he wakes up to find all their stolen clothes and supplies. Alma is alive although she was also beaten. As if all this couldn’t get more embarrassing, Martin cuts his foot.

The two stumble upon Zach (Reece Shearsmith), a seemingly sympathetic vagabond who remains illegally in the woods. He shows Martin and Alma his tent, where he offers to help him with Martin’s foot. It quickly gets weirder when Zach shows cuts on his arm. He rants endlessly about an almighty force in the woods. Someone “down to earth”.

Soon he takes steps to tag the two heroes, drug them, and stage them for his weird folk art images that are seemingly ritualistic for this dark force in the woods. There is a brief period of grotesque torture in a tent with an acting hammy black comedy of Zach, which thankfully is short, giving way to a thrilling thrill as Alma forges an escape. Tense scenes ensue as Zach targets Elma with a crossbow, accompanied by low shots of him sweeping the ground with an ax.

A machine in the woods starts flashing like a vibrating strobe light. The senses become hallucinatory. An electronic score soaked in acid sounds as seizure-inducing lights flash. Martin and Alma end up meeting an unlikely friend, and the movement to safety begins.

I wish that In the ground was as powerful, scary and memorable as I had expected at the start of the movie. Wheatley shows us a sinister nowhere with a palpable sense of the supernatural. Martin’s arrival at the Bungalow in the Sticks places a weaker, shy person in an inherently scary environment, made more intimidating by the doomsday bug that is ravaging the world. Martin has just freed himself from isolation in an infernal forest radiating dark energy alongside Alma, whom he does not know. The score is set to haunting psychedelic perfection every step of the way. Eighties electronic beats and strange bells ring. The camera moves viciously over Martin and Alma. An undefined evil persists, as folk tales and ancient spiritual practices are evoked.

Wheatley puts us in a particularly menacing woodland plot, puts the vulnerable characters in some sort of cryptic danger, and does so with an artistic touch and witty atmosphere that deserves to be commended. Sadly, most of the horror that materializes comes in the form of violent psychotic human antics that turn into a cliché, zone of modern horror torture.

In the ground is taking, I will say. When Zack enters the equation, the movie reaches stranger levels, and the flurries of chases and fights are undoubtedly thrilling. The artistic and drugged sequences that litter the last 20 minutes of the film are a strange and awe-inspiring sight. However, the movie comes across as much more than an ax maniac, nail-through-the-eye escapades, but it’s mostly what transgresses. Artistic editing cannot take advantage of a fright. Delicate shots cannot disturb a viewer. It can all be artistically sound and an impressive creative effort, but At the end runs out of terror because he does not use the atmosphere provided and the concepts he alludes to.

We have seen “Crazy Guy Tortures Innocents” horror movies thousands of times. This film is more than that, in terms of sparkle and sparkle, but at its core In the ground is just that – Alma and Martin fight to survive in the woods as they escape a madman. There are biting scenes. As mentioned, everything looks impressive and visually inspired. There are times when it feels like new tropes are going to unfold or other horrors are going to be uncovered, but Wheatley remains the safe and gratuitously violent path. It’s a disappointment considering the heavy dose of delusional and weird atmosphere that reigns.

If everything hadn’t opened up like a movie John Carpenter directed and recorded in the ’80s, the expectations might not have been so high. Ben Wheatley can make a film through the eye of an artist. The whole project moves at least like a shroom trip, giving off a feeling of unforgettable terror to come. This terror never quite shows itself, but it is interesting to watch and to listen to. I can’t call In the ground a great horror movie. It’s a well-made film that shows the signs of a talented director. Visually it’s weird and special and obviously the work of a film student who has seen some horrors and tried some drugs. It’s just not a memorable horror piece that uses his ideas and delivers in the original fear department. If you want to experience this hallucinatory cooler, it is now available to stream on Hulu.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Movieweb.


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Bad bosses can teach valuable lessons about what we tolerate https://horror-fanatics.com/bad-bosses-can-teach-valuable-lessons-about-what-we-tolerate/ https://horror-fanatics.com/bad-bosses-can-teach-valuable-lessons-about-what-we-tolerate/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 01:01:34 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/bad-bosses-can-teach-valuable-lessons-about-what-we-tolerate/ Tony Anderson / Getty I never suspected that my first two jobs would end up teaching me so much more than Customer service, work ethic and sales. Don’t get me wrong, this is all important too, but the most important life lessons came from bad bosses, who taught me how to define limits. I worked […]]]>
Tony Anderson / Getty

I never suspected that my first two jobs would end up teaching me so much more than Customer service, work ethic and sales. Don’t get me wrong, this is all important too, but the most important life lessons came from bad bosses, who taught me how to define limits.

I worked in a craft store, makeup artist for a luxury cosmetics line, and a loan officer, among others. But you would never guess the bizarre and downright horrible experiences I had at these works which otherwise seem quite dull and ordinary. I’m talking about a real-life “The Devil Wears Prada” situation – and witnessing workplace abuse from a manager who should have fired someone, but instead got promoted. (He was a dude, so naturally that was the easiest way to get him out).

We’ve all had bad bosses. There are a lot of horror stories circulating the global web. While it took me a long time to find the bright side of these experiences, I like to think that’s exactly what I did. I learned how much bullshit I couldn’t stand, and neither could you.

Of course, I’m not saying that only bad bosses are to blame. Other factors such as company culture, costumes (i.e. top management), and the people you work with side by side can certainly impact your experience. But take a lesson from someone who has failed to set limits at work time and time again: A paycheck, no matter how small, isn’t worth compromising your limits.

A lucky guy approach

Ah, Miranda Priestly. You hated her but you kind of loved her at the same time. Especially when she gave off just a little respect, making you think maybe if you just tried one little a little stronger, you would enter into his good graces. Yeah. He was my first bad boss. We worked for a luxury cosmetics line, and while some of us recognized that it was just another department store sales job, she put it on a whole different pedestal. . Basically you would think yours was the biggest job in the world to get your client that $ 160 face cream. Oh yeah, because all of that 3% commission was really worth all the nonsense.

What silliness I’m talking about? Devote all of our time and effort to soliciting presales twice a year. Literally I think we dreaded the five months leading up to the one month half year sale more than anything else. For example, I distinctly remember being in a hospital bed on my Blackberry, chatting with my boss to try to find an order I had placed in my pre-sale binder. Luckily my mom, who clearly had more common sense than I did at the time, took the phone out of my hand and said she has to go. She’s going to emergency surgery. What can I say ? I was 18 and incredibly eager to prove myself.

Long story short, she was a good woman, but not someone I would work for again. ‘Because all of you, if you call me for anything while I’m on my way to surgery, you better wish me luck – don’t ask me where I left a piece of paper. Did I learn my lesson by setting limits then? Well, not quite, but I took a step in the right direction by quitting this job.

I’m a strong woman, so … I’ll take the bullshit

After leaving this job, I moved on to what I thought was a better job in banking. I mean, I would get my nights and weekends back. Work-life balance could finally be a thing. Did I mention that I am working in a branch office, not in a corporate level back office job? Ah. Work-life balance, my ass.

As a consumer, I never thought of banking as a sales job. But oh, how wrong I was. The job was to find out how many clients you had in front of you. But more than that, how many accounts (or products) you could open for them. Yes, it was the days before this company was called out on his bullshit.

Again, my bad boss was a good person, but also a woman who let men step on him. She thought it made her worthy because she could take the bullshit. Yes, please disrespect me, and I’ll drop it because I’m not an emotional stereotype. I make the distinction because a male colleague of mine was constantly breaking into his office out of the blue, whether someone was there or not. When foot traffic was slow, he would complain and cause trouble. Worse yet, when he didn’t agree with something (or someone), he would literally swear and slam bullshit.

Talk about a toxic AF work environment. It’s not like she hasn’t seen him, and I know for a fact that this unacceptable behavior has been brought to her attention. (Yes, I was one of the people who said something.) Guess what the solution to the problem was? Promote it. I mean, yeah, it got him out of the branch, but it also reinforced bad behavior. I was thinking maybe when i was on maternity leave things could change, but of course it wasn’t. In fact, when my baby under three months old was hospitalized with a fever, the only call I got was to ask when I was coming back to the office. It was then that I decided there was no way I was going to come back.

You are a person, not just an employee

With experience, we become wiser. The hoops I was jumping in to please my bad bosses even made me nod and sigh. Right now, that was the only thing I could do because I was so conditioned by society to think that I needed the job, not that the job needed me.

Do not mistake yourself. I’m not a billionaire, millionaire, or even a hundred (if that’s a thing). There were times in my life when I absolutely couldn’t afford to be unemployed, but it’s worth emphasizing that these companies wouldn’t exist without us (their employees).

It’s important to set limits as an employee, because if you don’t, some managers will benefit. You are a person, not just an employee. You have feelings and deserve your limits to be respected. Be badass and don’t put up with bad bosses.


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Your weekly theme park recap (August 16-22, 2021) https://horror-fanatics.com/your-weekly-theme-park-recap-august-16-22-2021/ https://horror-fanatics.com/your-weekly-theme-park-recap-august-16-22-2021/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 20:21:51 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/your-weekly-theme-park-recap-august-16-22-2021/ 1. Halloween Horror Nights continues to grow I know that’s the main story every week, but we’re so excited for the return of Halloween Horror Nights. Following the announcement of the full lineup last week, all bets are off for development and preparation, and so far things are looking good. This week a number of […]]]>


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Meme artist raises more than $ 2 million in 5 hours to save Afghans on Taliban casualty list https://horror-fanatics.com/meme-artist-raises-more-than-2-million-in-5-hours-to-save-afghans-on-taliban-casualty-list/ https://horror-fanatics.com/meme-artist-raises-more-than-2-million-in-5-hours-to-save-afghans-on-taliban-casualty-list/#respond Wed, 18 Aug 2021 00:47:54 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/meme-artist-raises-more-than-2-million-in-5-hours-to-save-afghans-on-taliban-casualty-list/ We have all spent several days watching the news from Afghanistan with a mixture of horror, sadness and frustration. Images of crowds of people screaming to get on planes at Kabul airport, of human beings clinging to a flying jet before falling from the sky, hordes of desperate men, women and children to escaping from […]]]>

We have all spent several days watching the news from Afghanistan with a mixture of horror, sadness and frustration. Images of crowds of people screaming to get on planes at Kabul airport, of human beings clinging to a flying jet before falling from the sky, hordes of desperate men, women and children to escaping from a violent extremist regime crammed like sardines into American cargo planes is too much.

We know there are so many people we can’t help. This is the tragic reality. But there are people we can help. And it is happening, right now, on the Internet and on the ground in Afghanistan.


A humanitarian mission has been set up by former members of the U.S. military and special operations to remove hundreds of those on the Taliban-killed list from the country as soon as possible. The mission includes two planes, close links on the ground in Afghanistan and the logistical know-how to bring out a group of more than 300 women’s rights activists, translators and their families, as well as other high-value targets. who are in imminent danger. from the country.

Several collaborators coordinate the mission.

Sheffield Ford, an American veteran with 24 years of military special forces service, heads the private special missions company Raven Advisory, LLC. Ford was deployed to Afghanistan during his time on active duty and has extensive knowledge of how things work on the ground there, as well as connections with those in need of relief.

Karen Kraft, an army veteran who runs VME, a professional association US military veterans working in media and entertainment, also has ties to Afghans on the Taliban casualty list. She coordinates with the people on the ground to get them out. Ford and Kraft have been working together for about a week to get specific people on the theft manifesto who have been carefully vetted and known to be Taliban targets.

The planes, supplied by a defense-related product trading company, have pilots dedicated to carrying out this humanitarian mission. Two manned planes are ready and ready to enter the next day to bring the people listed on the manifesto to a country of asylum. Cost is the only real issue, as each plane full of passengers (including fuel, crew, security, clearances, etc.) costs $ 225,000. (Looking at it another way, it costs $ 1,500 per life saved, which seems a lot less intimidating.) The hope was to get at least one people plane out, but mission operators were asking for two. or more.

Now here’s the really amazing part. The money for the mission comes from ordinary people who care and want to do something to help. Thanks to a GoFundMe campaign, the incredible online community built by Same Artist / Fundraiser Extraordinary Tommy Marcus (a.k.a @ Quentin.Quarantino) appeared large.

Funds for the first plane have been raised in barely 38 minutes.

And in just over an hour, people had donated the entire amount needed for two planes. 11,000 people donated $ 550,000, for an average donation of $ 50 per person, just like that. Surprising.

The target has now been raised again to $ 2.2 million in hopes of getting more people planes out. Any funds raised that are not used for the rescue will be donated to the International Women’s Media Foundation, which helps protect high-risk women journalists in Afghanistan.

Things move fast in Afghanistan and there are a lot of moving parts in such a rescue mission, but this is what people can do when we come together, look for partners who are able and willing to team up, and invite others. to contribute.

As Gabe Reilich, Head of Content and Innovation at GOOD (who also served as an advisor for the mission), puts it:

“For all those who are tired of pointing fingers, tired of pointing out virtue without action, this is for us. The opportunity to make a real impact, to save real lives, to help people in need Help immediately It feels desperate to be sitting on the sidelines watching this tragedy unfold, and now it is possible to actually help.

Make no mistake, human decency and action make it possible to change the world, even if it is only the world of an individual, a life helped, a life saved . “

Indeed. Learn more about the mission and fundraising here.

CORRECTION: The original publication of this article contained the wrong name of the company that owns the aircraft used. This information has been updated.

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The icon that inspired the Bauhaus song ‘Bela Lugosi’s Dead’ https://horror-fanatics.com/the-icon-that-inspired-the-bauhaus-song-bela-lugosis-dead/ https://horror-fanatics.com/the-icon-that-inspired-the-bauhaus-song-bela-lugosis-dead/#respond Mon, 16 Aug 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://horror-fanatics.com/the-icon-that-inspired-the-bauhaus-song-bela-lugosis-dead/ Today, August 16, marks the 65th anniversary of the death of one of the most recognizable actors to ever grace the screen. On that day, in 1956, Bela Lugosi died at the age of 73. One of the most iconic actors to have been a part of Hollywood’s ‘golden age’, Lugosi’s life could be turned […]]]>

Today, August 16, marks the 65th anniversary of the death of one of the most recognizable actors to ever grace the screen. On that day, in 1956, Bela Lugosi died at the age of 73. One of the most iconic actors to have been a part of Hollywood’s ‘golden age’, Lugosi’s life could be turned into a movie in its own right. His most famous role is arguably his sinister take on the despicable but complex Count Dracula in the 1931 film, Dracula. The monochrome scene of him walking down the stairs to greet Jonathan Harker is one of the most recognizable ever shot. The smirk on his face when he said, “Welcome to you,” has been etched into the collective mind forever.

Its overtly Gothic approach to Count Dracula stands out as the best adaptation as it is closest to the source material. Due to its Hungarian origin, Lugosi’s accent delivers the count’s lines viciously, and it feels natural rather than forced. Additionally, his portrayal of the vampiric master exists at the center of the Venn diagram which includes countless adaptations of Bram Stoker’s 1987 novel, The Gothic Clip, Dracula. His point of view is iconic as it is effortless, not overly sexualized like that of Gary Oldman in the 1992s. Bram Stoker’s Dracula or the overly complicated playfulness inherent in the recent BBC adaptation.

Lugosi is up there with Boris Karloff and Christopher Lee. In fact, the latter will succeed Lugosi as Dracula in the Horror hammer films, from 1958. Since its release, Lugosi’s portrayal has inspired countless references across the spectrum of popular culture. His image has even endured through the works of art of others. Even the mastermind of pop art, Andy Warhol, was touched by Lugosi. The American artist’s 1963 silkscreen print ‘The Kiss’ depicts the scene from Dracula where the Earl is about to bite the neck of the film’s main lady, Helen Chandler, portraying the doomed Mina Harker.

In fact, even the heroes of “British Invasion” The Kinks would not escape Lugosi’s specter. His star on the illustrious Hollywood Walk of Fame is mentioned in their soft-rock track ‘Celluloid Heroes’, from their 1972 album, the aptly named, Everyone is in the Show-Biz.

However, the most definitive example of Lugosi influence came on August 6, 1979. The debut single from the legendary British post-punk Bauhaus, ‘Bela Lugosi’s Dead’, would change the face of music forever. Widely hailed as the first goth-rock record, it has been a staple of our death clubs since its release.

Lasting over nine minutes, the Gothic classic is actually steeped in irony. Although they derive their name from the death of the titular hero onscreen, the song’s composition was actually inspired by perhaps the least gothic genre of music in the world; reggae. Seeing the words reggae and gothic-rock in the same sentence automatically baffles the brain. It’s a marriage that shouldn’t work on paper, but it does.

In 2018, Bauhaus bassist David J revealed: “We were very influenced by reggae, especially dub. I mean, basically Bela was our take on dub. This revelation is made less shocking when we note that reggae and goth are at the heart of the concern to overturn the status quo and forge a course of their own.

Credit: Alamy

The dark, atmospheric room is unmatched in its sonic embodiment of the Earl. The words of singer Pete Murphy are unforgettable. The first verse openly refers to the star’s death and the inherent darkness of her character: “Bela Lugosi is dead / The bats have left the bell tower / The victims have been bled / The red velvet lines the black box” . In fact, the red velvet discussion can be interpreted as Murphy’s recognition of the underlying sexual stream of Dracula.

The song is also hailed as a critical in the development of goth-rock for the reason that it influenced two of the greatest gothic groups we know today. While Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Cure were very active and released records in 1979; it was only with the advent of the Bauhaus and the release of “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” that the transition from post-punk to full-fledged Goth was made.

In 2011, Alex Petridis praised this sentiment by the Guardian: “’Bela Lugosi’s Dead’ would have been just another post-punk experiment without the lyrics, which depicted the Dracula star’s funeral, with bats diving and virgin brides parading past his coffin. The effect was so overwhelmingly theatrical that dozens of bands formed in its wake. So much so, in fact, that goth quickly became a very codified musical genre.

Much like its titular actor, the song has endured and has since been covered by so many of our favorite artists, inside and outside of the goth realm. These include Nine Inch Nails, Chris Cornell, Massive Attack, Chvrches, and The Damned, to name a few. Much like the Bauhaus, the ancestor of goth-rock will continue to be spun by our Gothic peers for as long as they exist. Considering the annual advent of black-clad hordes descending on the British seaside town of Whitby, where Dracula was written, this trend shows no signs of slowing down.

So on the anniversary of Bela Lugosi’s death, why not revisit this Gothic masterpiece?

Listen to ‘Bela Lugosi’s Dead’, below.

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