How a forgotten daredevil villain turned Marvel’s Kate Bishop into Hawkeye

Today, we take a look at the surprising influence an obscure Daredevil villain has had on the life of Kate Bishop, Hawkeye.

This is “Foundationed Deep”, a feature where we look at special weird / weird / interesting cases of retroactive connection of different comic book characters (for example, Strange X-Men # 268 retroactively established that Wolverine knew both Captain America and the black widow of WWII).

With Kate Bishop doing her Marvel Cinematic Universe this week, I thought it would be nice to show the retroactive reveal Jeff Lemire made in the excellent All-New Hawkeye series of him with artists Ramón K. Pérez and Ian. Herring (Herring colored the story while Pérez colored the flashback footage himself in a kind of gorgeous watercolor approach) on what inspired Kate Bishop to become a superhero when she got older.


But first, we need to learn more about … the Matador!

RELATED: How Did Hawkeye’s Famous Aunt Become an Avenger?

WHO IS THE VILLAIN OF DAREDEVIL, THE MATADOR?

The original Daredevil creator Bill Everett was unable to keep the series regular (Everett was also the creator of Namor the Sub Mariner in the late 1930s and he just couldn’t adapt to make a regular book in 1964) and therefore the first problems of daredevil were a fascinating examination of how much the star artists of the 1950s did NOT enjoy working for Marvel, despite the big buzz the company had in the mid-1960s. The great horror artist Joe Orlando (who later became a publisher leading for DC) picked up the book with the second issue and it was NOT in it, as it ran into the Marvel Method (where Orlando would have to trace the book and draw it, then Stan Lee would add the dialogue) . In daredevil # 5, Lee was able to convince the great Wallace Wood to take over the book and Wood’s short term on the book was amazing (it’s fascinating how well Lee made Wood’s debut on the book. is an interesting question to wonder how many regular Marvel readers in 1964 even knew Wood’s name), and even though Wood was a more skilled plotter than many artists of his generation, he was still angered by the setup. , because he felt he should be paid more if he was, in his mind, essentially writing the book. Lee even eventually agreed to give him more credit (and money), but Wood didn’t like the way Lee went about it (which makes the comic look like Lee was doing Wood a favor by letting him write a number while Wood plotted all of his numbers), so Wood left after about six and a half numbers.

However, his very first issue was probably not his most beloved story, because if Wood makes the most of it, he’s still about a villain known as … the Matador …

And yes, that’s basically it. He’s just a villainous Matador who always makes Daredevil seem silly …

Daredevil searches for his opponent and discovers his origin. He was one of the greatest matadors in the world, but the crowds turned on him for being too cruel to the bulls and they booed him relentlessly. One of those times they booed him so much that he hesitated …

and he almost died from a bull attack. He then vowed revenge on, well, basically humanity as a whole …

Ultimately, Daredevil’s knowledge of his past shakes the Matador and he is able to be defeated easily …

The Matador will only make a few appearances over the next fifty years. Up to…

RELATED: Marvel Revealed The Celestials Created Mutants In A Very Unexpected Place

THE IMPACT OF MATADOR ON KATE BISHOP’S LIFE

The All new Hawkeye The series saw Kate and Clint Barton go their separate ways as partners when Kate became disillusioned with Clint after declaring that he would no longer be watching over a group of mutated children whose powers made them valuable weapons. The problem was, Kate and Clint didn’t want SHIELD to watch them because SHIELD could use them as weapons as well, but as long as they were with the kids they were great targets. Clint finally walked away and Kate pulled away from him, disgusted by his selfishness.

This then began to contrast with the flashbacks to Kate’s past where she is seen trying to reestablish a relationship with her father as a young girl, but to no avail …

She then discovers that her father is apparently a criminal!

She decides to follow him on his next trip after finding him severely beating a man. She then learned that, yes, he was not just a criminal, but that he was kind of a low level supervillain, working with the Matador!

Later, however, Kate was discovered snooping around the Matador’s hiding place …

And when the Matador found out that she was the daughter of his former business partner, well, things turned bad for Kate …

However, Kate is so badass that even though the Matador made her call her father to tell him that she was this villain’s hostage, she found a way to turn the tide and get out of the base of the Matador, trying to get home. Before she can, though …

She was shocked to see that Hawkeye and the Avengers were there to save her …

In a great streak, she meets Captain America and Iron Man, but that wasn’t what interested her (well, not AS interested) …

No, she loved and admired others, but they were basically gods. No, the one she was interested in was the guy who had just struggled with those oversized figures with just a bow and arrows …

As she reconciles with Clint in the future, we also see Kate establishing how Hawkeye is her idol as a kid as she marks her arrow in her journal.

What a cute story, and with such beautiful illustrations.

If anyone else has a suggestion for a Foundationed Deep (retroactive connections between characters), please write to me at [email protected]

KEEP READING: Eternals: How One MCU Hero Almost Doomed The X-Men (And Earth)

Thanos wearing the glittering Infinity Gauntlet

The Strongest Powers, Worst Weaknesses, and Greatest Dangers in the Infinity Gauntlet


About the Author



Source link

Comments are closed.