The 10 most anticipated films at the 2021 Fantasia International Film Festival

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It wasn’t easy to choose only ten films to be passionate about, but we did it anyway.

By Rob Hunter and Brianna ZiglerPublished August 6, 2021

We’re starting our 2021 Fantasia Film Festival coverage with a list of the movies we can’t wait to see…


Longtime readers of the site will know that one of our favorite film festivals takes place each year in beautiful Montreal, Canada for three full weeks. From the amazing people running the whole shebang to the wide array of movies showing in the amazing city itself, we love the Fantasia Film Festival. Like most other festivals, they focused on a virtual setting last year as the world faced the pandemic, and as we can’t put our collective shit together as a species and the pandemic rages on. , they stay online for 2021 too. We hope to be able to return to the festival in person next year, but for now, we’re excited to check out its ever-eclectic offerings online as the festival celebrates its 25th anniversary.

Brianna Zigler and I will both be covering the festival this year, and at the start we wanted to highlight the films we are most waiting for. Fantasia 2021 plays over a hundred features, and those are just ten of the ones we’re hoping to catch. Be sure to check out the Fantasia official website for information on virtual tickets and access to screenings, as this year’s program is once again filled with a multitude of new genres arriving from all over the world. Read on to see which movies we can’t wait to see the most.

The most anticipated films of the Fantasia Film Festival 2021


Taurus

Taurus

There’s an eternal dearth of tight, clever, and petty revenge thrillers, and when they do arrive, they’re usually movies worth celebrating. The most promising opportunity to play at this year’s film festival is that of Paul Andrew Williams Taurus. The always big and intense Neil maskell (Kill list, 2011) plays an ex-executor who returns to town in search of blood and revenge, and evidently finds him. Former criminal partners are her targets, and with her missing son as well, everything will become very personal very quickly. As a bonus, the film is less than 90 minutes long and promises practical gore effects worthy of ‘mid-80s Tom Savini’, so yeah, it’s obviously one of my most anticipated films this year. [Rob Hunter]


The deep house

The deep house

A haunted house movie set underwater? You really shouldn’t need to know more to immediately queue for The deep house, but just in case you’re still not convinced – and if not why not and what’s wrong with you – here’s some more. He is the last of the directors Alexandre bustillo and Julien maury, the writers / directors of Inside (2007), Livid (2011), Among the living (2014), Kandisha (2020) and more. A good hour of the film went underwater, a shoot that took thirty-three days under the surface, and although it’s designed as a found-footage-style livestream, its unique location and proven filmmakers mean that ‘this could just be the wet nightmarish dream we’re looking for. [Rob Hunter]


Don’t say her name

Don't say her name

While I casually joke above about the dearth of tight little revenge thrillers, there is a very real shortage of films by and / or about Indigenous people. This Canadian horror film harnesses these talents both on and off screen, and its Indigenous setting allows the story to unfold among its people and culture. The synopsis teases an eco-horror film as a mining company’s intrusion into the land arouses the wrath of nature itself, and its snow-capped setting promises a nightmarishly white landscape that filmmakers really should use. more often. The film is director / co-writer Rueben Martellis his first feature film, and if it’s even half as good as we’d expect, it should be far from the last. [Rob Hunter]


Ghost gloria

Ghost gloria

Ghost gloria is described as being a woman in need of an orgasm. As a woman, color me pleasantly intrigued! In fact, the incumbent Gloria (Stefania Tortorella), maybe never even had an orgasm, and her quest alongside her friend Sandra (Nenan Pelenur) to finally experience it is even more complicated when she meets the right guy – who turns out to be a ghost. A genre film that includes nuances of horror, fantasy and erotic comedy, the second feature film from Uruguayan directors Marcela Matta and Mauro sarser is meant to be a subversive love movie, and from that premise alone, it’s hard to argue with that. Ghost gloria it sounds refreshing, fun, inventive, sex positive, and quirky – whatever I’m actively looking for in modern cinema to keep my brain from blowing my brains out. [Brianna Zigler]


King Car

King Car

I’m not gonna lie, it’s hard not to be interested in the sci-fi premise of a man who can talk to cars in the wake of Titaniumthe success of this year at the Cannes Film Festival, especially since we still have a little over two months before the theatrical release in the United States. To help me out so far, there is a Brazilian movie called King Car, about the son of a taxi driver who has a strange gift for communicating with motor vehicles. But when a car kills his mother, he avoids what he once loved – that is, until tragedy strikes, forcing Uno to return to his family of motorheads as he sets out to save. and reshaping his father’s car business for a sustainable future. . So, Renata pinheriothe first narrative feature film by King Car attempts an extra dose of commentary on progressivism and late capitalism and the political climate of Brazil. With similar comparisons made with that of Cronenberg crash like with Titanium, 2021 is potentially shaping up to be a successful year for thrilling car movies. [Brianna Zigler]


Midnight in a perfect world

Midnight in a perfect world

By Filipino director Dodo DayaoThe second film, Manila’s Near Future has been turned into a ‘perfect world’ by the powers that be, with intermittent blackouts occurring after midnight and random curfews imposed that you don’t want to be caught in. breaking. In Midnight in a perfect world, four friends find refuge after dark in a government-sanctioned “safe house” where they find things only get worse. Described by film critic Ariel Esteban Cayer as a “proudly experimental” and “hallucinatory” horror film, the claustrophobic premise and the combined commentary on Duterte’s current diet seem to be promising ingredients for a touching horror film. [Brianna Zigler]


Sadness

Sadness

The ongoing pandemic has already spawned several films and shows telling stories and commenting on our new normal, but few have taken the idea to the extreme of Sadness. Writer / Director Rob jabbaz‘S horror thriller sees a flu-like virus mutate into something much worse, and soon the streets turn red. Word put on the movie suggests that it flips the zombie subgenre on its rotting head and features some truly outrageous visuals and paces, and it all feels like the exact kind of nightmare storyline we might need to end. our suffering in the real world. Unless that, however, I’ll settle for a survival and crane tale. [Rob Hunter]


The suicide squad

The end of the suicide squad explained

Warner Bros.

I would be remiss if I didn’t admit that I’m more excited for The suicide squad of James gunn because of the circumstances surrounding the movie rather than the movie itself, but I also think it’s going to be pretty good. I tend to like Gunn’s stuff, and I’m a huge fan of him guardians of the galaxy chapters, the only Marvel movies to which I swear allegiance. But there’s just something so wonderfully chaotic about the DC movies trying to piece together a failed movie by essentially acting like the first hasn’t even happened, while also co-opting half of the original cast and hiring. the director that the first film looked like a style of. Marvellous! Whether Gunn’s take is better or worse (there’s a good chance the latter is possible) than 2015’s Suicide Squad, the stacked cast is going to be interesting to watch, and the DC movies generally produce the most interesting superhero fare in the franchise’s current landscape. Their work features episodes that vary in style and quality so much that they always manage, at the very least, to keep things interesting. [Brianna Zigler]


Ultrasound

Ultrasound

Director Rob schroederfirst feature film by, after working mainly in production, stars Mad Men-alum Vincent Kartheiser. Ultrasound follows a man named Glen who is forced to spend the night with a strange married couple after his car breaks down, and it’s an encounter that ends up being the catalyst for a life-changing chain of events. The official synopsis for the film says nothing more so as not to spoil a film supposedly full of surprising twists and turns. Ultrasound is written by Conor Stechschulte and adapted from his own acclaimed graphic novel “Generous Bosom”. Like a Mad Men fan and self-proclaimed Pete Campbell simp, I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the main reason I’m looking forward to this – aside from the compelling premise – is to see Kartheiser again. [Brianna Zigler]


When i consume you

When i consume you

Director Perry blackshear quietly burst onto the genre scene in 2015 with the ever-haunting They look like people, and he followed it in 2019 with the atmosphere Mermaid. He’s back with a third feature film – once again starring his three favorite actors, Margaret Ying Drake, MacLeod Andrews and Evan Dumouchel – and it once again promises a thoughtful and touching chill. When i consume you pits a pair of adult siblings against a mysterious figure chasing their every move. There is a supernatural element at play here, but just as powerful and possibly even more devastating are the very real pains that come with being human. I’ll be online for whatever Blackshear produces, so that was a no-brainer for inclusion on my most anticipated list. [Rob Hunter]


The 25th anniversary edition of the Fantasia International Film Festival runs from August 5 to 25. Visit their site and see movies!

Related subjects: Fantasia Film Festival

Rob Hunter has been writing for Film School Rejects since before you were born, which is odd considering he’s so young. He’s our chief film critic and associate editor and cites “Broadcast News” as his all-time favorite. Don’t hesitate to say hello if you see him on Twitter @FakeRobHunter.



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