Why Batman has to be the Dark Knight’s first horror movie

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After the excitement surrounding the film’s disturbing trailer, speculation is rife about the form The batman could take the big screen. From the footage released so far, it’s clear the upcoming film will revel in a much darker tone than many previous DCEU releases. However, beyond the lackluster lighting and sinister characters, the film represents a real opportunity to create Batman’s first full-fledged horror feature. Despite the risks involved in engaging in the horror genre, the rewards could be very spectacular, both for the film itself and for the DCEU at large.

It emerges from the little concrete information available to us on The batman that the film will revel in Gotham’s dark underbelly. The trailer, for example, opens with a haunting image of Paul Dano’s Gaffa Riddler sticking a disabled body to the ground – echoing terrifying crime thriller films from the past such as David Fincher’s. Se7en. This sets the tone for footage featuring murders, graphic violence, and several disturbing images of the film’s antagonists, including Catwoman, Penguin, and The Riddler himself.


Related: How The Batman Could Make The Riddler Creepier Than The Joker

All of this indicates that the end result will be about as far removed from Adam West’s campy and ironic portrayal of the Caped Crusader as it is possible to get. However, they also suggest an opportunity to take both the character and the entire DCEU in a chilling new direction. Given the legacy of what happened in previous films, The batman perhaps just the perfect way to tackle the DCEU’s well-documented issues with tone while still giving audiences a truly terrifying onscreen rendition of arguably the most iconic character in comics. Here’s why Robert Pattinson The batman must be the first dark knight horror film.

Why Batman Movies Are Horror Movies Already

Batman Intimidating Carmine Falcone - Batman Begins

There have been several iterations of Batman on the big screen over the years, with some renditions more effective than others. What all of the more successful versions do, without fail, however, is embrace the gruesome reality of fighting Gotham’s most dangerous criminals. Whether it’s Tim Burton’s popular 1989 film or Christopher Nolan’s more contemporary Dark Knight trilogy, the most acclaimed Batman films invariably celebrate the darkness at the center of the character and show flashes of horror throughout. during.

A good example is that of 2005 Batman begins. One of the key plot points of the film is the militarization of a panic-causing toxin, derived from a rare plant that grows near the League of Shadows headquarters. Throughout the film, this toxin causes terrifying hallucinations and is effectively used by deranged psychiatrist Jonathan Crane – also known as Scarecrow. While the film itself is not a full-fledged horror film, the presence of horror tropes is undeniable and also serves to make it a more effective viewing experience.

There are many other examples of Batman movies borrowing from horror movie tropes. For example, Penguin’s depraved and controversial plot to assassinate all of Gotham’s firstborns in Batman Returns wouldn’t seem out of place in a movie like This, while the relentless violence of characters like The Joker and Two-Face in The black Knight echoes some of the most iconic killers in ’80s slasher movies. None of these movies have been considered horror flicks first and foremost. However, it’s clear from how the best Batman movies successfully incorporate horrific elements that the long-running series already has horror built into its DNA. It would therefore be quite logical that The batman to go further and totally embrace this dark heart.

Related: How Zack Snyder’s Robin Plan Improved Batman’s Arc

The batman horror movie can fix DCEU tone issues

Robert Pattinson in Batman

One of the main criticisms of the DCEU films so far has been the franchise’s perceived serious tone. This not only caused problems for the negative reception of 2016 Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, but was also the motivator behind many equally poorly received rewrites Justice League film in 2017. To date, the DCEU has struggled to give many of its films the dramatic weight required by such a brooding tone. However, with horror, the Universe has the opportunity to correct its most obvious flaw.

Horror movies are, by their nature, often necessarily serious in order to inflict maximum terror. While the line between horror and comedy is often blurred, to really make an impact on an audience a film needs to engage and take its fears seriously. This makes the genre a natural fit for the already heavy and consistent tone of much of the DCEU at large. By not backing down and trying to change what has been so central to the other films in the franchise at large, a Batman horror movie can actually justify its seriousness. Ultimately, that could help give him a bigger dramatic punch and shield him from the critiques of humorlessness and presumption that have plagued other recent DCEU films.

Conversely, the thin line between horror and comedy could – perhaps counterintuitively – also help lighten the feel of the entire film, without depriving it of any real impact. In simple action movies, such as BvS and Justice League, it’s much harder to inject humor without losing the menacing tone that has been the hallmark of the DCEU to this day. This explains why BvS seems so inevitably dark and Justice League feels like such a mess. Doing The batman a horror film, the filmmakers can simultaneously dismiss one of DC’s most repeated critiques and still retain the look, feel, and overall tone that the franchise has so clearly sought out. Either way, horror as a genre represents a real chance to right the mistakes of the past.

Source material requires Batman horror movie

Batman and the Joker from Joker War.

While previous Batman films have borrowed heavily from horror, audiences have yet to see a scary Dark Knight story on the big screen. Considering the character’s origins, the wealth of terrifying source material, and even other audiovisual portrayals of the character, Batman is clearly overdue for a truly chilling cinematic release.

Related: Why Robert Pattinson’s Batman Is ‘Radically Different’

One of the most compelling arguments in favor of a Batman horror film is the key role fear plays for the character himself. Batman and Bruce Wayne are both motivated by mastering their fear and using fear as an effective tool in their arsenal. In Batman begins, Bruce Wayne explains to Alfred that his motivation for adopting the bat methodology is because “bats scare me … It is time that my enemies share my fear.This evocation of fear shows how central emotion is to the whole Batman mythos and highlights why the character would be so naturally suitable for a horror film.

There are many other examples of horror playing a key role in the previous Batman material. For example, the popular game Batman: Arkham Asylum featured one of the most haunting scenes in console history, as the player explores a terrifying morgue while being taunted by the Joker. Comics also frequently draw on horror tropes. For example, the 2012 series Death of the family features a version of the Joker who surgically removes his own face – echoing the antics of horror icon Hannibal Lecter. With such a rich legacy of terror to draw on, it’s almost surprising that there hasn’t been a true Batman horror movie yet. If the DCEU is willing to take risks, The batman can just change that.

More: The Batman: How Pattinson’s Salary Compares To Bale’s For Batman Begins

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